Dan Kaufman



Average rating: 4.07 · 385 ratings · 84 reviews · 16 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Fall of Wisconsin: The ...

4.11 avg rating — 336 ratings — published 2018 — 5 editions
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Essays That Will Get You in...

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3.88 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 1998 — 4 editions
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Essays That Will Get You in...

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3.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2003 — 2 editions
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The Routledge Companion to ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2012 — 4 editions
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Dealing with grumpy editors

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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Natural Sleep

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Red Flags and Pixies

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Essays That Will Get You in...

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Essays That Will Get You in...

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3.71 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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“What was Fodor like?

Funny you should ask that, as I had a little dust-up over at Daily Nous not long ago, with an old graduate-school friend, Samir Chopra, on the subject of Fodor, in a discussion thread about him, after he’d just died. It turns out that one thing I really liked about Fodor was what Chopra disliked the most about him, namely his (in my view) hilarious argumentative affect and manner. Some of the shit he would do in class and at colloquia was just legendary. One thing I remember was a philosophy of mind class, where a really wacko student – you know, the guy who everyone silently prays isn’t going to talk or ask a question – just said something completely bizarre – I think it was that material objects are “waves of probability” or something like that – and Fodor, looking tormented, staggered over to the wall, drew a square on it with a black marker, and began banging his head in the center of it, going “No, no, no….” I almost pissed myself, it was so hilarious. And the square stayed there long after, so you’d be in some other class, and people would ask, “Why is there a square drawn on the wall in marker?” and you’d get to tell the story and crack up all over again.

Now Samir takes this sort of thing as evidence of just how what a meanie Fodor was and as representative of a kind of meanie philosophy that too many philosophers engage in, and he lamented how it “alienated” him. It was all very much in the mode of the current sensitivity-culture everyone seems to be in the grip of, which I just find humorless and precious and representative of everything about the current cultural moment that I can’t stand.”
Dan Kaufman, The Routledge Companion to Seventeenth Century Philosophy

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