Jeff Hawkins



Average rating: 4.11 · 6,961 ratings · 571 reviews · 21 distinct worksSimilar authors
On Intelligence

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4.12 avg rating — 6,388 ratings — published 2004 — 16 editions
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A Thousand Brains: A New Th...

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4.05 avg rating — 524 ratings — published 2021 — 8 editions
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Michael Jordan: : Basketbal...

4.50 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Professional Techniques for...

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3.11 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
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Playing Pro Hockey

3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Professional Marketing & Se...

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3.14 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2001 — 5 editions
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Richmond Railroads (Images ...

3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2010 — 4 editions
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Comportamiento del Consumidor

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings
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World Series

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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Cocoa and Objective-C Cookbook

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
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More books by Jeff Hawkins…
“It is the ability to make predictions about the future that is the crux of intelligence.”
Jeff Hawkins, On Intelligence

“Deep Blue didn't win by being smarter than a human; it won by being millions of times faster than a human. Deep Blue had no intuition. An expert human player looks at a board position and immediately sees what areas of play are most likely to be fruitful or dangerous, whereas a computer has no innate sense of what is important and must explore many more options. Deep Blue also had no sense of the history of the game, and didn't know anything about its opponent. It played chess yet didn't understand chess, in the same way a calculator performs arithmetic bud doesn't understand mathematics.”
Jeff Hawkins, On Intelligence

“There are two ways to think about ourselves. One is as biological organisms, products of evolution and natural selection. From this point of view, humans are defined by our genes, and the purpose of life is to replicate them. But we are now emerging from our purely biological past. We have become an intelligent species. We are the first species on Earth to know the size and age of the universe. We are the first species to know how the Earth evolved and how we came to be. We are the first species to develop tools that allow us to explore the universe and learn its secrets. From this point of view, humans are defined by our intelligence and our knowledge, not by our genes. The choice we face as we think about the future is, should we continue to be driven by our biological past or choose instead to embrace our newly emerged intelligence?”
Jeff Hawkins, A Thousand Brains: A New Theory of Intelligence



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