David Lebovitz

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David Lebovitz is a sought-after cooking instructor with an award-winning food blog (davidlebovitz.com). Trained as a pastry chef in France and Belgium, David worked at Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California for twelve years. He now lives in Paris, France, where he leads culinary tours of the city.

Average rating: 4.0 · 28,991 ratings · 2,028 reviews · 10 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Sweet Life in Paris: De...

3.85 avg rating — 12,288 ratings — published 2009 — 20 editions
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The Perfect Scoop: Ice Crea...

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4.18 avg rating — 7,738 ratings — published 2007 — 11 editions
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Ready for Dessert: My Best ...

4.26 avg rating — 3,293 ratings — published 2010 — 7 editions
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My Paris Kitchen: Recipes a...

4.19 avg rating — 3,327 ratings — published 2014 — 6 editions
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L'Appart: The Delights and ...

3.52 avg rating — 1,926 ratings — published 2017 — 6 editions
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The Great Book of Chocolate...

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4.01 avg rating — 206 ratings — published 2004 — 4 editions
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Room for Dessert: 110 Recip...

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4.40 avg rating — 111 ratings — published 1999
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Ripe for Dessert: 100 Outst...

3.89 avg rating — 66 ratings — published 2003
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Paris Pastry Guide

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3.92 avg rating — 36 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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Delicious Adventures in the...

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More books by David Lebovitz…


I discovered this drink in The Auberge of the Flowering Hearth, a book I seem to reread every couple of years. Written by Roy Andries de Groot, it’s an ode to a charming auberge (inn), nestled in the French alps, where two women created magical meals for their guests. Like most meals in France, their menus began with an apéritif. One in the book was a glass of Dubonnet, with an equal amount of...

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Published on December 11, 2018 02:33

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December 2014, David Lebovitz
"His Favorite Cookbooks: The author of My Paris Kitchen, a Choice Finalist for Best Food & Cookbooks, offers some mouth-watering picks." ...More

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David Lebovitz wrote a new blog post



I discovered this drink in The Auberge of the Flowering Hearth, a book I seem to reread every couple of years. Written by Roy Andries de Groot, it’... Read more of this blog post »
More of David's books…
“Parisians are always in a big hurry, but are especially frantic if they’re behind you. They’re desperate to be where they rightfully feel they belong: in front of you. It’s a whole other story when you’re behind them, especially when it’s their turn: suddenly they seem to have all the time in the world.”
David Lebovitz, The Sweet Life in Paris: Delicious Adventures in the World's Most Glorious - and Perplexing - City

“Spécial" is one of those elusive French words that means something (or someone) is...peculiar. The use of it is one of the rare times that the French are noncommittal about their opinions.”
David Lebovitz, L'Appart: The Delights and Disasters of Making My Paris Home

“Shaping the mounds of dough is easiest to do with a spring-loaded ice cream scoop, although you can use two spoons or a pastry bag with a large, plain tip. 1 cup (250 ml) water ½ teaspoon coarse salt 2 teaspoons sugar 6 tablespoons (90 g) unsalted butter, cut into small chunks 1 cup (135 g) flour 4 large eggs, at room temperature ½ cup (85 g) semisweet chocolate chips ½ cup (60 g) pearl sugar (see Note) Position a rack in the upper third of the oven. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. Heat the water along with the salt, sugar, and butter in a medium saucepan, stirring, until the butter is melted. Remove from heat and dump in all the flour at once. Stir rapidly until the mixture is smooth and pulls away from the sides of the pan. Allow the dough to cool for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally to release the heat; then briskly beat in the eggs, one at a time, until the paste is smooth and shiny. Let cool completely to room temperature, then stir in the chocolate chips. If it’s even slightly warm, they’ll melt. Drop mounds of dough, about 2 tablespoons each, on the baking sheet, evenly spaced. Press pearl sugar crystals liberally over the top and sides of each mound. Use a lot and really press them in. Once the puffs expand, you’ll appreciate the extra effort (and sugar). Bake the chouquettes for 35 minutes, or until puffed and well browned. Serve warm or at room temperature. STORAGE: Choquettes are best eaten the same day they’re made. However, once cooled, they can be frozen in a zip-top freezer bag for up to one month. Defrost at room temperature, then warm briefly on a baking sheet in a moderate oven, until crisp.”
David Lebovitz, The Sweet Life in Paris: A Recipe for Living in the World's Most Delicious City




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