Fitz Hugh Ludlow





Fitz Hugh Ludlow


Born
in New York City, The United States
September 11, 1836

Died
September 12, 1870

Genre


Fitz Hugh Ludlow, sometimes seen as “Fitzhugh Ludlow,” was an American author, journalist, and explorer; best-known for his autobiographical book The Hasheesh Eater (1857).

-Wikipedia


Average rating: 3.59 · 82 ratings · 12 reviews · 18 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Hasheesh Eater: Being P...

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3.65 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 1857 — 17 editions
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The Hasheesh Eater

2.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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A Brace Of Boys 1867, From ...

it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2011
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The Heart Of The Continent:...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
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Substance Abuse Six Pack 2 ...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2015
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The Phial Of Dread By An An...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2004
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The Phial of Dread and othe...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013
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Das Joint Drehbuch

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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The Heart of the Continent:...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2015 — 9 editions
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Little Brother: And Other G...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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More books by Fitz Hugh Ludlow…
“In absolute incommunicableness it stood apart, a thought, a system of thought which as yet had no symbol in spoken language”
Fitz Hugh Ludlow, The Hasheesh Eater: Being Passages from the Life of a Pythagorean

“Hasheesh is indeed an accursed drug, and the soul at last pays a most bitter price for all its ecstasies; moreover, the use of it is not the proper means of gaining any insight, yet who shall say that at that season of exaltation I did not know things as they are more truly than ever in the ordinary state? Let us not assert that the half-careless and uninterested way in which we generally look on nature is the normal mode of the soul’s power of vision. There is a fathomless meaning, an intensity of delight in all our surroundings, which our eyes must be unsealed to see.”
Fitz Hugh Ludlow, The Hasheesh Eater: Being Passages from the Life of a Pythagorean

“It is this process of symbolization which, in certain hasheesh states, gives every tree and house, every pebble and leaf, every footprint, feature, and gesture, a significance beyond mere matter or form, which possesses an inconceivable force of tortures or of happiness.”
Fitz Hugh Ludlow, The Hasheesh Eater: Being Passages from the Life of a Pythagorean