Clark Aldrich



Average rating: 3.86 · 690 ratings · 90 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Unschooling Rules: 55 Ways ...

3.86 avg rating — 598 ratings — published 2010 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Learning by Doing: The Comp...

3.93 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 2005 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Learning Online with Games,...

3.89 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2009 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Simulations and the Future ...

3.64 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Complete Guide to Simul...

3.75 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 2009 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Designing Sims: Create Awar...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
Learning Online with Games,...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011
Rate this book
Clear rating
Games and Simulations in On...

by
4.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2006 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Clark Aldrich…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“the goal of schools shouldn’t be to manufacture “productive citizens” to fill some corporate cubicle; it should be to inspire each child to find a “calling” that will change the world.”
Clark Aldrich, Unschooling Rules: 55 Ways to Unlearn What We Know About Schools and Rediscover Education

“Each child has a spark of genius waiting to be discovered, ignited, and fed. And the goal of schools shouldn’t be to manufacture “productive citizens” to fill some corporate cubicle; it should be to inspire each child to find a “calling” that will change the world. The jobs for the future are no longer Manager, Director, or Analyst, but Entrepreneur, Creator, and even Revolutionary.”
Clark Aldrich, Unschooling Rules: 55 Ways to Unlearn What We Know About Schools and Rediscover Education

“Many school programs seem to offer either The Cultural Literacy Track or The Vocational Track. The Cultural Literacy programs are designed for the “smart kids” who are going to go on to ever-higher levels of both education and financial success. This track, with no pretense of being real world, includes classes on classics, foreign languages, and math theory (such as calculus). It is a curriculum based on “teach what has been taught.” The Vocational programs are for the “remedial kids” who are going to have only blue-collar futures if they are in high school (taking classes such as wood working) or inflexible paraprofessional paths if they are in college (such as degrees in physical therapy). This two-tier approach is an immoral sorting system with crippling consequences. Maybe worse, it also presents a false dichotomy. Instead, true wisdom comes from a synthesis of those two perspectives and more. The”
Clark Aldrich, Unschooling Rules: 55 Ways to Unlearn What We Know About Schools and Rediscover Education



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Clark to Goodreads.