Jordan M. Poss

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Born
in Athens, Georgia, The United States
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March 2012

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A native of Rabun County, Georgia, Jordan M. Poss holds a master's degree in European History from Clemson University, where he studied Anglo-Saxon England and military history. He currently teaches history at a community college in upstate South Carolina, where he lives with his wife and children. He is the author of No Snakes in Iceland, The Last Day of Marcus Tullius Cicero, the World War II thriller Dark Full of Enemies, and Griswoldville, a novel of the Civil War.

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Jordan M. Poss Read, read, read. Never stop reading. It is foolish to believe that you can write well without having read a lot, but lots of people fall for that…moreRead, read, read. Never stop reading. It is foolish to believe that you can write well without having read a lot, but lots of people fall for that trap. Read what you enjoy but challenge yourself, too, and have a group or network of friends to feed you new recommendations constantly. I've discovered some of my favorite books thanks to friends. (less)
Jordan M. Poss Without jinxing myself by offering too much detail, this project is much closer to home--a novella set in Georgia late in the American Civil War.
Average rating: 4.21 · 43 ratings · 23 reviews · 4 distinct worksSimilar authors
No Snakes in Iceland

4.33 avg rating — 18 ratings2 editions
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The Last Day of Marcus Tull...

3.82 avg rating — 11 ratings2 editions
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Griswoldville

4.33 avg rating — 6 ratings2 editions
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Dark Full of Enemies

4.38 avg rating — 8 ratings2 editions
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The Haunting of H...
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The Moonshine War
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Jordan is on page 68 of 182 of The Haunting of Hill House
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
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Bang the Drum Slowly by Mark Harris
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The Natural by Bernard Malamud
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Shadow on the Mountain by Margi Preus
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The Moonshine War by Elmore Leonard
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Calico Joe by John Grisham
Calico Joe
by John Grisham (Goodreads Author)
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Good, short, genuinely moving story about old wounds, redemption, and baseball. Also has some pretty potent themes of father-son relationships and boyhood hero worship. One or two false notes near the end keep it from five stars for me, but otherwise ...more
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Pitch That Killed by Mike Sowell
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In God's Garden by Amy Steedman
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Jordan made a comment on his status in Our Island Saints
Our Island Saints by Amy Steedman
" Kim wrote: "She has another one called In God’s Garden that I just started with my kids. We really enjoyed the first story, and I anticipate enjoying ...more "
Jordan is on page 40 of 182 of The Haunting of Hill House
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
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More of Jordan's books…
“If we approach medicine fearfully how much more so should we approach politics. But”
Jordan M. Poss, The Last Day of Marcus Tullius Cicero

“Someone might object that men have always been like us, that there was greed, effeminacy, and corruption from the foundation of the city, and I would point to proportion. Men so easily forget Nature and Reason, yes, and this is a constant inclination, and so far I agree with the objection. But in some places virtue is made easy and in others hard, and in Rome the former become the latter. You can see it in our leaders. Think of Cincinnatus, respected enough to be offered the dictatorship in a crisis, respectful enough to give it up when the crisis had passed. That is virtue. I think I can stop with this one example—no need to contrast him with recent dictators.”
Jordan M. Poss, The Last Day of Marcus Tullius Cicero

“At last, he said, “They may be a despicable people, but only one thing can change that.”
Jordan M. Poss, No Snakes in Iceland

Topics Mentioning This Author

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English Translati...: * Norway 52 612 Aug 28, 2017 05:46AM  
“You could tell by the way he talked, though, that he had gone to school a long time. That was probably what was wrong with him.”
John Kennedy Toole, A Confederacy of Dunces

“Where men are forbidden to honour a king they honour millionaires, athletes, or film-stars instead: even famous prostitutes or gangsters. For spiritual nature, like bodily nature, will be served; deny it food and it will gobble poison.”
C.S. Lewis, Present Concerns

“Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. They may be more likely to go to Heaven yet at the same time likelier to make a Hell of earth. This very kindness stings with intolerable insult. To be "cured" against one's will and cured of states which we may not regard as disease is to be put on a level of those who have not yet reached the age of reason or those who never will; to be classed with infants, imbeciles, and domestic animals.”
C.S. Lewis, God in the Dock: Essays on Theology (Making of Modern Theology)

“micel walcan wolde we do from that daeg micel walcan in the great holt the brunnesweald but though we walced for wices months years though this holt becum ham to me for so long still we did not see efen a small part of it so great was this deop eald wud. so great was it that many things dwelt there what was not cnawan to man but only in tales and in dreams. wihts for sure the boar the wulf the fox efen the bera it was saed by sum made this holt their ham. col beorners and out laws was in here as they was in all wuds but deop deoper efen than this was the eald wihts what was in angland before men

here i is meanan the aelfs and the dweorgs and ents who is of the holt who is the treows them selfs. my grandfather he telt me he had seen an aelf at dusc one daeg he seen it flittan betweon stoccs of treows thynne it was and grene and its eages was great and blaec and had no loc of man in them. well he was blithe to lif after that for oft it is saed that to see an aelf is to die for they sceots their aelf straels at thu and aelfscot is a slow death”
Paul Kingsnorth

“For Satan, as for Marx, religion was an impediment to the grand design of transforming humanity from a collection of free-willed, autonomous individuals into a mass of self-corralling slaves who mistake security for liberty and try to keep the cognitive dissonance to a minimum in order to function.”
Michael Walsh, The Devil's Pleasure Palace: The Cult of Critical Theory and the Subversion of the West




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