Cherise Wolas

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Los Angeles, The United States
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October 2013


Cherise Wolas is the author of the novels The Resurrection of Joan Ashby and The Family Tabor.

The Resurrection of Joan Ashby is a 2019 International Dublin Literary Award nominee, a PEN Debut Fiction Prize semi-finalist, a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice and Paperback Row selection, an American Bookseller Association Indie Next Great Read pick, a Kirkus Reviews Best Novel and Best Debut Novel of 2017 and named a Best Novel, Best Debut Novel, and top 10 novel of the year, by various other venues. Published now in France, the UK, and Poland, it’s being translated into a variety of other languages, including Hebrew, Turkish, and Chinese.

The Family Tabor is an ABA Indie Next Great Read in Hardcover, Paperback, and for Reading Groups
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Cherise Wolas Hi Jane!

Thank you for being my very first question here!

I think I was born with this particular superpower—to read voraciously and retain what I read…more
Hi Jane!

Thank you for being my very first question here!

I think I was born with this particular superpower—to read voraciously and retain what I read, and I feel so lucky to have it.

Two books that have made a great impression on me in the last few years are 2666 by Roberto Bolano, his final book before he died, and The Sound of Things Falling by Juan Gabriel Vasquez. Both are South American writers. Bolano was Chilean, Vasquez is Colombian.

2666 is massive, 900 pages, with a title that remains elusive (though apparently explained in another novel). It is a five-part narrative, each comprised of different characters and stories. Each part is amazing, but it’s only at the end do you start to realize each is like the spoke of wheel, and you begin to see how the spokes unite, see that it is a wheel. It is a stylistically rich literary labyrinth that defies categorization, and yet, perhaps unbelievably, it is easy to read. It mesmerized me, and I plan to read it again.

The Sound of Things Falling by Vasquez, at 320 pages, seems like a novella in comparison. It is an exploration of the ways in which stories profoundly affect lives, and how the stories of others affect us. When I finished it, I promptly read all of Vasquez’s other novels and collections.

Neither of these marvelous novels influenced The Resurrection of Joan Ashby; I read them after writing it. But perhaps I’m so enamored with them (and am always recommending them) because their themes resonate intensely with me both as a reader and as a writer who explores narratives within narratives and the interrelationship of things. They are different but equally fabulous writers for whom the actual writing is as important as the plot, which it what I strive for too.


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Cherise Wolas
Hi Ilene Harris,
I’m so pleased you loved The Resurrection of Joan Ashby! And so pleased too that you loved Joan Ashby’s short stories. Ah, you want to…more

Hi Ilene Harris,
I’m so pleased you loved The Resurrection of Joan Ashby! And so pleased too that you loved Joan Ashby’s short stories. Ah, you want to know what happens to Silas and Abe, the twins abandoned at birth, lovingly fostered, and then sent away on their 18th birthdays. Maybe, one day, they will have their own book. And yes, I am writing more books and thrilled that I will have you as a reader! (less)
Average rating: 3.8 · 2,611 ratings · 767 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Resurrection of Joan Ashby

3.86 avg rating — 1,869 ratings — published 2017 — 16 editions
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The Family Tabor

3.65 avg rating — 742 ratings — published 2018 — 9 editions
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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Author Interview with Cherise Wolas for the Campaign for the American Reader

I answered some fantastic questions in connection with my second novel, THE FAMILY TABOR, about writing, titles, naming characters, if my teenager reader self would be surprised by my novels, if I find it harder to write beginnings or endings, if I see myself in my characters, and what non-literary inspirations influence me.

The link is: bit.ly/TheFamilyTaborCWolas Read more of this blog post »
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Published on April 23, 2020 09:01

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Cherise’s Recent Updates

Cherise Wolas started reading
The Shape of the Ruins by Juan Gabriel Vásquez
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Ordinary Girls by Jaquira Díaz
Ordinary Girls
by Jaquira Díaz (Goodreads Author)
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Review to come.
Cherise Wolas is currently reading
Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli
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Cherise Wolas is on page 283 of 336 of Ordinary Girls
Ordinary Girls by Jaquira Díaz
Ordinary Girls
by Jaquira Díaz (Goodreads Author)
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Love and Other Thought Experiments by Sophie  Ward
"The snippets from media reviews dotting the covers of Sophie Ward’s Love and Other Thought Experiments are bizarrely out of step with its content, the ideas explored don’t compare to Voltaire’s or Sartre’s, the structure and style have nothing in com" Read more of this review »
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Betty by Tiffany McDaniel
Betty
by Tiffany McDaniel (Goodreads Author)
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The Glass House by Beatrice Colin
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Like a Bird by Fariha Roisin
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The Caretaker by Doon Arbus
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These Violent Delights by Micah Nemerever
These Violent Delights
by Micah Nemerever (Goodreads Author)
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More of Cherise's books…
“Joan thinks then that writers have infinite choices and mothers nearly no choice at all.”
Cherise Wolas, The Resurrection of Joan Ashby

“Treacheries experienced in childhood are among the most difficult to overcome, or to forgive, as are dreams crushed when one is too young.”
Cherise Wolas, The Resurrection of Joan Ashby

“Joan Ashby is one of our most astonishing writers, a master of words whose profound characters slip free of the page...”
Cherise Wolas

Topics Mentioning This Author

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Ladies & Literature: ARC Giveaway: Meanie Genie 37 18 May 08, 2017 05:08PM  
Books on the Nigh...: What are you reading, August, 2017 37 99 Sep 01, 2017 09:49AM  
“When asked 'Do you think great things are ahead of you or behind you?' Harry had replied, 'The past no longer exists, there is only the future, whatever it may hold,' and something about his answer to that consideration of mystical simplicity has continued to give him pause”
Cherise Wolas, The Family Tabor

“Joan Ashby is one of our most astonishing writers, a master of words whose profound characters slip free of the page...”
Cherise Wolas

“The middle seat holds an old woman, teeny, not much bigger than a doll. She is creased and wrinkled and rheumy-eyed. Her eyes, though, beneath their cloudy scrim, sparkle like emeralds. And she is bright. She is very bright. Her cheeks rouged a happy pink. Her sweater a hot pink, the vibrant color masking the heavy load on her sloped, thin shoulders.”
Cherise Wolas, The Resurrection of Joan Ashby

“A bright red car whizzes past. She is like that car, carrying herself with spangle and spark, but the strength that has long held her up is weakening.”
Cherise Wolas, The Family Tabor




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