Erving Goffman


Born
in Mannville, Alberta, Canada
June 11, 1922

Died
November 19, 1982

Genre

Influences


Erving Goffman (June 11, 1922 – November 19, 1982) was a Canadian-born sociologist and writer.

Considered "the most influential American sociologist of the twentieth century" (Fine, Manning, and Smith 2000:ix), as a subjective analyst, Goffman's greatest contribution to social theory is his study of symbolic interaction in the form of dramaturgical analysis that began with his 1959 book The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. Goffman's other areas of study included social order and interaction, impression management, total institutions, social organization of experience, and stigmas. Some of the influences on his works include Durkheim, Freud, Mead, Radcliffe-Brown, and Simmel.

In 2007 Goffman was listed as the 6th most-cited intellectual
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Average rating: 4.07 · 7,545 ratings · 327 reviews · 32 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Presentation of Self in...

4.10 avg rating — 3,657 ratings — published 1959 — 37 editions
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Stigma: Notes on the Manage...

3.98 avg rating — 1,836 ratings — published 1963 — 24 editions
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Asylums: Essays on the Soci...

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4.17 avg rating — 935 ratings — published 1961 — 24 editions
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Interaction Ritual - Essays...

4.05 avg rating — 305 ratings — published 1967 — 17 editions
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Frame Analysis: An Essay on...

3.94 avg rating — 232 ratings — published 1974 — 10 editions
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Behavior in Public Places

4.11 avg rating — 205 ratings — published 1963 — 15 editions
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Gender Advertisements

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 89 ratings — published 1979 — 5 editions
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Forms of Talk

3.84 avg rating — 79 ratings — published 1981 — 6 editions
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The Goffman Reader

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4.22 avg rating — 60 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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Relations in Public

3.90 avg rating — 49 ratings — published 1971 — 13 editions
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More books by Erving Goffman…
“And to the degree that the individual maintains a show before others that he himself does not believe, he can come to experience a special kind of alienation from self and a special kind of wariness of others.”
Erving Goffman, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life

“Approved attributes and their relation to face make every man his own jailer; this is a fundamental social constraint even though each man may like his cell.”
Erving Goffman

“The stigmatized individual is asked to act so as to imply neither that his burden is heavy nor that bearing it has made him different from us; at the same time he must keep himself at that remove from us which assures our painlessly being able to confirm this belief about him. Put differently, he is advised to reciprocate naturally with an acceptance of himself and us, an acceptance of him that we have not quite extended to him in the first place. A PHANTOM ACCEPTANCE is thus allowed to provide the base for a PHANTOM NORMALCY.”
Erving Goffman, Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity