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Sandra Evans

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Sandra Evans drew inspiration for This Is Not a Werewolf Story (Simon & Schuster, 7.26.16) from cultural sources, including the “sympathetic werewolf” stories of twelfth-century France, Celtic myths, and the folklore of the Pacific Northwest. She wrote the novel for (and with input from) her son. Sandra is a native of Whidbey Island and earned her doctorate in French literature from the University of Washington. This Is Not a Werewolf Story is her first book for children.
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Sandra Evans My 9 year old son came home from school one day and started telling me all about a knight named Bisclavret who spends every weekend in the woods as a …moreMy 9 year old son came home from school one day and started telling me all about a knight named Bisclavret who spends every weekend in the woods as a wolf. It was a story I knew well--it was one of the reasons I had fallen in love with medieval French literature some 15 years earlier. I asked him where he had heard the story and he said it was in a picture book in one of his classrooms. It made me realize how appealing the plot was to all ages. He and I worked out the setting and characters together while we walked to school or when I was driving him to the Y after. Every day he'd meet me at the door to his classroom and ask, "You wanna hear the quotes of the day?" and I'd say, "Oh yeah!" When I started teaching part-time in a high school (because it turns out writing fiction doesn't pay any better than loving medieval French literature) I found it to be pretty fertile ground for inspiration as well.(less)
Sandra Evans Hi Hannah Rose!
Thanks for the question. Yes, I think there will be a sequel. At the moment I am nearly finished writing a prequel. It's set in 3500 B…more
Hi Hannah Rose!
Thanks for the question. Yes, I think there will be a sequel. At the moment I am nearly finished writing a prequel. It's set in 3500 B.C. in southwestern France and tells the story of the young woman who makes all the magic happen. Once I manage to get this story right, I'm going to turn back to Raul and Mary Anne. I wasn't sure at first if I should do a sequel, but I've been visiting some schools and the questions students ask really get me thinking about what IS happening in White Deer Woods right now. Thanks so much for reading my story and I hope you have a lovely Saturday with lots of sunshine.(less)
Average rating: 4.17 · 454 ratings · 87 reviews · 1 distinct workSimilar authors
This Is Not a Werewolf Story

4.17 avg rating — 454 ratings — published 2016 — 7 editions
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A white orca in Puget sound? So rare. So wonderful.

These are dark days but this dear Earth we live on gives us one joyous marvel after another.

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Published on April 18, 2020 14:00

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Sandra Evans is now friends with Laura LeClercq
Sandra Evans and 5 other people liked Amy's review of Harvard Square:
Harvard Square by André Aciman
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“I hated almost every member of my department, from the chairman down to the secretary, including my fellow graduate students, hated their mannered pieties, their monastic devotion to their budding profession, their smarmy, patrician airs dressed dow" Read more of this review »
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Harvard Square: A Novel
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Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
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The Orphan's Tale by Pam Jenoff
The Orphan's Tale
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4.5 stars. A heartfelt tale of friendship and motherhood, with the circus as a space of refuge during WW 2. Definitely worth your time.
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Clock Dance by Anne Tyler
Clock Dance
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I wish I had remembered to review this right after I finished reading it. I had a lot to say about it! Mainly, obviously, I loved this story about a woman making her way in the world. Beautifully written and very authentic.
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Raising Good Humans by Hunter Clarke-Fields
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The Orphan's Tale by Pam Jenoff
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Clock Dance by Anne Tyler
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The Emerald Lie by Ken Bruen
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More like a 3.5, but I'm rounding up a bit here on the stars because I'm wondering if my occasional disappointment in the writing was due primarily to two facts :
1. I watched the series first.
So.
Iain Glen's face and voice.
Not sure you need a plot
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William Trevor
“A person's life isn't orderly ...it runs about all over the place, in and out through time. The present's hardly there; the future doesn't exist. Only love matters in the bits and pieces of a person's life.”
William Trevor

Corrie ten Boom
“Worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, it empties today of its strength.”
Corrie Ten Boom, Clippings from My Notebook

Hermann Hesse
“For me, trees have always been the most penetrating preachers. I revere them when they live in tribes and families, in forests and groves. And even more I revere them when they stand alone. They are like lonely persons. Not like hermits who have stolen away out of some weakness, but like great, solitary men, like Beethoven and Nietzsche. In their highest boughs the world rustles, their roots rest in infinity; but they do not lose themselves there, they struggle with all the force of their lives for one thing only: to fulfil themselves according to their own laws, to build up their own form, to represent themselves. Nothing is holier, nothing is more exemplary than a beautiful, strong tree. When a tree is cut down and reveals its naked death-wound to the sun, one can read its whole history in the luminous, inscribed disk of its trunk: in the rings of its years, its scars, all the struggle, all the suffering, all the sickness, all the happiness and prosperity stand truly written, the narrow years and the luxurious years, the attacks withstood, the storms endured. And every young farmboy knows that the hardest and noblest wood has the narrowest rings, that high on the mountains and in continuing danger the most indestructible, the strongest, the ideal trees grow.

Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth. They do not preach learning and precepts, they preach, undeterred by particulars, the ancient law of life.

A tree says: A kernel is hidden in me, a spark, a thought, I am life from eternal life. The attempt and the risk that the eternal mother took with me is unique, unique the form and veins of my skin, unique the smallest play of leaves in my branches and the smallest scar on my bark. I was made to form and reveal the eternal in my smallest special detail.

A tree says: My strength is trust. I know nothing about my fathers, I know nothing about the thousand children that every year spring out of me. I live out the secret of my seed to the very end, and I care for nothing else. I trust that God is in me. I trust that my labor is holy. Out of this trust I live.

When we are stricken and cannot bear our lives any longer, then a tree has something to say to us: Be still! Be still! Look at me! Life is not easy, life is not difficult. Those are childish thoughts. Let God speak within you, and your thoughts will grow silent. You are anxious because your path leads away from mother and home. But every step and every day lead you back again to the mother. Home is neither here nor there. Home is within you, or home is nowhere at all.

A longing to wander tears my heart when I hear trees rustling in the wind at evening. If one listens to them silently for a long time, this longing reveals its kernel, its meaning. It is not so much a matter of escaping from one's suffering, though it may seem to be so. It is a longing for home, for a memory of the mother, for new metaphors for life. It leads home. Every path leads homeward, every step is birth, every step is death, every grave is mother.

So the tree rustles in the evening, when we stand uneasy before our own childish thoughts: Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours. They are wiser than we are, as long as we do not listen to them. But when we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy. Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness.”
Herman Hesse, Bäume. Betrachtungen und Gedichte

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