Camille Fournier


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For the 19thC gynaecologist, see Camille Fournier.

Camille Fournier is the former chief technology officer of Rent The Runway and former vice president of technology at Goldman Sachs.

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Average rating: 4.33 · 3,590 ratings · 334 reviews · 3 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Manager's Path: A Guide...

4.34 avg rating — 3,552 ratings — published 2017 — 14 editions
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97 Things Every Engineering...

3.24 avg rating — 37 ratings6 editions
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A Arte da Gestão: Um Guia P...

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“As you go through various stages of your career, you’ll start to realize how much uncertainty there is in the world. It’s a pretty universal truth that once you get the job you thought you wanted, the enjoyment eventually fades and you find yourself looking for something else. You think you want to work for that cool startup, and you get there only to find it’s a mess. You think you want to be a manager, only to discover that the job is hard and not rewarding in the ways you expected. In all of this uncertainty, the only person you can rely on to pull through it is yourself.”
Camille Fournier, The Manager's Path: A Guide for Tech Leaders Navigating Growth and Change

“For example, if overwork is due to (in)stability of the production systems, it’s your job as the manager to slow down the product roadmap in order to focus on stability for a while. Make clear measures of alerts, downtime, and incidents, and strive to reduce them. My advice is to dedicate 20% of your time in every planning session to system sustainability work (“sustainability” instead of the more common “technical debt”).”
Camille Fournier, The Manager's Path: A Guide for Tech Leaders Navigating Growth and Change

“Senior engineers can develop bad habits, and one of the worst is the tendency to lecture and debate with anyone who does not understand them or who disagrees with what they are saying. To work successfully with a newcomer or a more junior teammate, you must be able to listen and communicate in a way that person can understand, even if you have to try several times to get it right. Software development is a team sport in most companies, and teams have to communicate effectively to get anything done.”
Camille Fournier, The Manager's Path: A Guide for Tech Leaders Navigating Growth and Change



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