Clayborne Carson


Born
in Buffalo, New York, The United States
June 15, 1944

Genre


Clayborne Carson is professor of history at Stanford University, and director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute. Since 1985 he has directed the Martin Luther King Papers Project, a long-term project to edit and publish the papers of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Average rating: 4.36 · 16,819 ratings · 844 reviews · 72 distinct worksSimilar authors
A Knock at Midnight: Inspir...

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4.53 avg rating — 318 ratings — published 1998 — 23 editions
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In Struggle: SNCC and the B...

4.18 avg rating — 232 ratings — published 1981 — 4 editions
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The Eyes on the Prize Civil...

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4.39 avg rating — 228 ratings — published 1991 — 5 editions
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The Autobiography of Martin...

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4.34 avg rating — 14,120 ratings — published 1986 — 43 editions
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Martin Luther King: The Ess...

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4.61 avg rating — 69 ratings — published 2001 — 3 editions
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Malcolm X: The FBI File

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3.99 avg rating — 69 ratings — published 1991 — 5 editions
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A Call to Conscience: The L...

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4.58 avg rating — 786 ratings — published 1969 — 22 editions
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Reporting Civil Rights, Par...

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4.59 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2003
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Reporting Civil Rights, Par...

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4.68 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 2003
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Civil Rights Chronicle

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4.71 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 2003
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“It's not quite as valuable as if it had been written in 1929, when Martin Luther King was born.”
Clayborne Carson, A Knock at Midnight: Inspiration from the Great Sermons of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

“But America, as I look at you from afar, I wonder whether your moral and spiritual progress has been commensurate with your scientific progress. It seems to me that your moral progress lags behind your scientific progress. Your poet Thoreau used to talk about “improved means to an unimproved end.” How often this is true. You have allowed the material means by which you live to outdistance the spiritual ends for which you live. You have allowed your mentality to outrun your morality. You have allowed your civilization to outdistance your culture. Through your scientific genius you have made of the world a neighborhood, but through your moral and spiritual genius you have failed to make of it a brotherhood. So America, I would urge you to keep your moral advances abreast with your scientific advances.”
Clayborne Carson, A Knock at Midnight: Inspiration from the Great Sermons of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

“We are prone to judge success by the index of our salaries or the size of our automobiles, rather than by the quality of our service and relationship to humanity.”
Clayborne Carson, The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.



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