Andrew Bernstein


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Average rating: 3.98 · 603 ratings · 58 reviews · 29 distinct worksSimilar authors
Capitalist Manifesto: The H...

4.22 avg rating — 120 ratings — published 2005
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Rand's Atlas Shrugged

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3.80 avg rating — 163 ratings — published 2000 — 19 editions
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Ayn Rand For Beginners

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3.68 avg rating — 60 ratings — published 2009 — 5 editions
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Capitalism Unbound: The Inc...

4.32 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 2009 — 7 editions
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Objectivism in One Lesson: ...

4.08 avg rating — 40 ratings — published 2008 — 5 editions
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Heart of a Pagan

3.91 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 2002
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Fountainhead (Cliffs Notes)

3.79 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 2000 — 10 editions
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Capitalist Solutions: A Phi...

4.29 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2011 — 8 editions
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Rand's Anthem (Cliffs Notes)

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2.78 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2000 — 7 editions
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Modern Passings: Death Rite...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2006 — 2 editions
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“Each one of us has the power — and must develop the will — to be the hero of his own life. We believe in goals, in purposes, in achievement and in the joy of living.”
Andrew Bernstein

“In the history of philosophy, the term “rationalism” has two distinct meanings. In one sense, it signifies an unbreached commitment to reasoned thought in contrast to any irrationalist rejection of the mind. In this sense, Aristotle and Ayn Rand are preeminent rationalists, opposed to any form of unreason, including faith. In a narrower sense, however, rationalism contrasts with empiricism as regards the false dichotomy between commitment to so-called “pure” reason (i.e., reason detached from perceptual reality) and an exclusive reliance on sense experience (i.e., observation without inference therefrom). Rationalism, in this sense, is a commitment to reason construed as logical deduction from non-observational starting points, and a distrust of sense experience (e.g., the method of Descartes). Empiricism, according to this mistaken dichotomy, is a belief that sense experience provides factual knowledge, but any inference beyond observation is a mere manipulation of words or verbal symbols (e.g., the approach of Hume). Both Aristotle and Ayn Rand reject such a false dichotomy between reason and sense experience; neither are rationalists in this narrow sense.

Theology is the purest expression of rationalism in the sense of proceeding by logical deduction from premises ungrounded in observable fact—deduction without reference to reality. The so-called “thinking” involved here is purely formal, observationally baseless, devoid of facts, cut off from reality. Thomas Aquinas, for example, was history’s foremost expert regarding the field of “angelology.” No one could match his “knowledge” of angels, and he devoted far more of his massive Summa Theologica to them than to physics.”
Andrew Bernstein

“Here is the tragedy of theology in its distilled essence: The employment of high-powered human intellect, of genius, of profoundly rigorous logical deduction—studying nothing. In the Middle Ages, the great minds capable of transforming the world did not study the world; and so, for most of a millennium, as human beings screamed in agony—decaying from starvation, eaten by leprosy and plague, dying in droves in their twenties—the men of the mind, who could have provided their earthly salvation, abandoned them for otherworldly fantasies.”
Andrew Bernstein

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