James Tooley



Average rating: 3.99 · 391 ratings · 68 reviews · 24 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Beautiful Tree: A Perso...

4.06 avg rating — 331 ratings — published 2009 — 11 editions
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The Miseducation of Women

3.06 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 2002 — 8 editions
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From Village School to Glob...

3.67 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Imprisoned in India: Corrup...

4.71 avg rating — 7 ratings2 editions
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Education Without The State

3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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Comeuppance: My Experiences...

4.25 avg rating — 4 ratings2 editions
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The Global Education Indust...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1999 — 3 editions
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What America Can Learn from...

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Government Failure

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2003
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Buckinham at 25: Freeing th...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2001
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“Meanwhile, in the government school, I guess that children were awaiting the arrival of their teachers from the plusher suburbs of Accra, caught in the snarled traffic on the Cape Coast highway, reluctant conscripts to the poor fishing village. No matter, the children could patiently wait, playing on the swings and roundabouts thoughtfully provided by their American donors.”
James Tooley, The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves

“It appeared that these private schools, while operating as businesses, also provided philanthropy to their communities. The owners were explicit about this. They were businesspeople, true, but they also wanted to be viewed as “social workers,” giving something back to their communities. They wanted to be respected as well as successful.”
James Tooley, The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves



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