Mollie Panter-Downes


Born
in London, The United Kingdom
August 25, 1906

Died
January 22, 1997

Genre


Mary Patricia "Mollie" Panter-Downes was a novelist and newspaper columnist for The New Yorker. Aged sixteen, she wrote The Shoreless Sea which became a bestseller; eight editions were published in 1923 and 1924, and the book was serialised in The Daily Mirror. Her second novel The Chase was published in 1925.

After her marriage to Aubrey Robinson in 1927, the couple moved to Surrey, and in 1938 Panter-Downes began writing for the New Yorker, first a series of short stories, and from September 1939, a column entitled Letter from London, which she wrote until 1984. The collected columns were later published as Letters from England (1940) and London War Notes (1972).

After visiting Ootacamund, in India, she wrote about the town, known to all as
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Average rating: 4.08 · 2,209 ratings · 337 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
Good Evening, Mrs Craven: T...

4.10 avg rating — 1,065 ratings — published 1999 — 7 editions
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One Fine Day

4.06 avg rating — 520 ratings — published 1947 — 4 editions
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Minnie's Room: The Peacetim...

4.13 avg rating — 143 ratings — published 2002
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London War Notes, 1939-1945

4.12 avg rating — 173 ratings — published 1971 — 4 editions
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My Husband Simon

3.81 avg rating — 74 ratings — published 1931 — 2 editions
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Letter From England

3.78 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1940 — 2 editions
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Ooty Preserved: A Victorian...

3.71 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1954 — 3 editions
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At The Pines: Swinburne And...

3.50 avg rating — 8 ratings2 editions
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The Shoreless Sea

it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1923
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The Chase

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1925
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More books by Mollie Panter-Downes…
“He looked at her amiably, as though she were a nice sofa. That must be the penalty of the grey hairs, the tired shadows under the eyes, that must be the beginning of getting old. She had noticed it. Young men looked at you as though you were a nice sofa, an article of furniture which they would never be desirous of acquiring.”
Mollie Panter-Downes, One Fine Day
tags: aging

“Before the war cut her life so sharply in two, she had cherished her possessions jealously. ... Now that she had discovered the important truth that her flesh was as brittle as theirs and far more precious, the safety of china cupids had become irrelevant.”
Mollie Panter-Downes, Good Evening, Mrs Craven: The Wartime Stories of Mollie Panter-Downes

“Through the green slats of their private look-out post they could quiz the adult world, queer mixture of stupidity and power, getting on with its incomprehensible affairs, unconscious of spies in the undergrowth.”
Mollie Panter-Downes, One Fine Day

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