T.L. Greylock

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T L Greylock's first series is The Song of the Ash Tree, a Norse saga featuring plenty of axes. She loves wild rice, Rafael Nadal's forehand, and driving on small, twisty roads. She also considers herself a baker of pies, but this is debatable.

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T.L. Greylock Thanks for the question, Phil!

I really like the connections historical fantasy allows me, and hopefully others, to make. Taking something familiar,…more
Thanks for the question, Phil!

I really like the connections historical fantasy allows me, and hopefully others, to make. Taking something familiar, say Norse mythology or the Spanish Inquisition or the Crusades, and twisting it into something new but recognizable brings a story closer to home for me. It feels more relatable. In The Song of the Ash Tree, I was able to use the mythology that would be familiar to many readers, but I also got to make up a landscape for that to take place in--it's Midgard, not Norway--so I like to think I got to play in both sandboxes.

I think my thoughts on this stem from the fact that I devoured historical fiction--not fantasy--as a child and young adult. It makes sense that my work would be informed by that personal history.

I have worked in secondary worlds before, and my current project exists in such a world. It's been fun to wander there, but I'd also say it's reminded me that building from the ground up is hard! (less)
T.L. Greylock Over the course of writing the first drafts for all three books in The Song of the Ash Tree, I taught myself that writer's block is a figment of the…moreOver the course of writing the first drafts for all three books in The Song of the Ash Tree, I taught myself that writer's block is a figment of the imagination. I always suspected this, but in establishing a daily writing routine for 18 months, I became a true believer. Out of those 18 months, or 547 days, I think I chose not to write perhaps 20 times. Even if I only got a few hundred words down, it still mattered and I didn't allow the quantity (or lack of!) to discourage me. As my routine became instinctive during the course of the first book, it became easier to up my daily quantity.

But surely there were days when I struggled?

Of course.

Here are some suggestions (repeated by authors with a lot more books under their belts):

1. Set a routine and stick to it as best you can. During the 4.5 months it took to draft The Blood-Tainted Winter, the only two days I did not write were Christmas Eve and New Year's Day. I found I didn't have to write at the same time every day (some authors are much more adamant about this), but I also found that I went in cycles. For a few weeks, I might churn out words better at 10 PM, but then the good mojo might shift to 8 AM. I learned to go with the flow while still making sure I wrote every day.

2. Stop editing. Seriously. This. Prior to writing The Blood-Tainted Winter, when I opened up whatever project I was working on, I would re-read what I had last written. Sometimes I would re-read from the beginning. By the time I got to the blank space that needed filling, I was bored, discouraged, hungry.... You name it, it kept me from making progress. When I decided to make a serious commitment to this nebulous Norse project, I also made the decision to cut out (smother, slaughter, burn, whatever it would take) my bad habit of re-reading. I'm convinced this made all the difference during the early stages of The Blood-Tainted Winter before my routine and good habits were strong enough to keep propelling me forward. Even so, I didn't read a single word of that draft until a month after I finished it.

3. Understand that you can always fix what you put on the page. This goes hand in hand with the previous point, but I think it deserves a separate discussion because it falls within the realm of in-the-moment second guessing, rather than next day second guessing. When it came to maintaining my routine, there were days when I was faced with a scene I wasn't sure how to approach, or days when I could only trip through a few hundred words. Whatever the stumbling point might be, I reminded myself that nothing had to be perfect at that stage. Rough spots can be smoothed over, gaping holes can be filled--LATER. Get the story on the page.

4. If you're facing a truly catastrophic block, you may need to ask yourself why that is. I didn't suffer from this, so I may not be the best to speak to it (though I do think I avoided this simply because I refused to believe it was possible--mind over matter!). But I do think that if you're finding a scene to be particularly prickly or you just aren't sure what direction to go next, you need to ask yourself some questions. Are you planning on writing this scene because you think it should be there or because it's the right scene at the right moment? Is the story still the right story? Does it still cause your heart to beat a little faster? It's okay to take a moment and measure these things because you have to be passionate for this to work.

The short answer is that I don't deal with writer's block because I don't allow it to exist. But I also know that the first three points were vital to my ability to finish The Song of the Ash Tree. Maybe they will help you, too!(less)
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Lost Lore: A Fantasy Anthology

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More books by T.L. Greylock…

Patreon Launch!

My Patreon is live! Not familiar with Patreon?  It’s a platform that allows creators to connect with fans and find new ones–and make a few extra bucks along the way. If you’re here, you’re already supporting me, and I am beyond grateful for that. But if you want to do a little more, check out my […]
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Published on August 06, 2018 06:50
The Blood-Tainted Winter The Hills of Home Already Comes Darkness
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4.09 avg rating — 244 ratings

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Grey Sister by Mark  Lawrence
"Wow, I loved this book. I thought it would be nigh impossible to equal or surpass the enjoyment I received from Red Sister, I was wrong, very wrong.

Grey Sister continues all the great aspects of the former book with an intriguing plot, diverse cha..." Read more of this review »
T.L. and 6 other people liked Nick T. Borrelli's status update
Nick T. Borrelli
Nick T. Borrelli is 15% done with Sin Eater: I've been so blessed to be able to read some incredible self-published books this year already. Mike Shel is right near the top of the list when it comes to my favorite authors writing right now. The guy has some serious chops and his books are creepy (in a good way). Sin Eater is just amazing so far. Even though I'm only 15% into the book I just know that this is going to be another phenomenal read.
The Ring of Water by Chris Bradford
More of T.L.'s books…
Neil Gaiman
“I liked myths. They weren't adult stories and they weren't children's stories. They were better than that. They just were.”
Neil Gaiman, The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Josiah Bancroft
“Spring is gray and miserable and rainy for three or four weeks while the snow melts. The ditches turn into creeks and everything you own is clammy as a frog belly. Then one morning, you walk outside and the sun is out and the clover has grown over the ditches and the trees are pointed with leaves, like ten thousand green arrowheads, and the air smells like..." and here he had to fumble for a phrase, "like a roomful of stately ladies and one wet dog.”
Josiah Bancroft, Senlin Ascends

Mark Twain
“Substitute 'damn' every time you're inclined to write 'very;' your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”
Mark Twain

417136 Lost Lore Readalong! — 128 members — last activity Oct 13, 2018 06:18PM
This is an open group (so, EVERYONE is invited) for exploring the FREE fantasy anthology, Lost Lore (released on Monday 15th January, don'tchaknow) Th ...more
4170 The Sword and Laser — 23649 members — last activity 1 hour, 15 min ago
Online discussion forum for the Sword and Laser podcast and monthly book club pick. Subscribe to the audio podcast: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast ...more
636120 The Cool Kids' Fantasy Club — 1312 members — last activity 8 hours, 42 min ago
A group to chat about SFF books. Authors and readers welcome. I might post about my books and the Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off too. I plan on makin ...more



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message 10: by Emily

Emily Hi Taya,

Thanks for the friend request. Lions of Al Rassan is a great book. I'd have to say I have a few favorites at the moment. Age of Myth, Shadow of What Was Lost and probably Lion of Senet. Looking forward to chetting books with you. 😊


message 9: by T.L.

T.L. Jody wrote: "Thank you for the friend request, Taya! :)"

Thanks for accepting!


message 8: by T.L.

T.L. Dani wrote: "Hi Taya,
Thanks for the friend request!
Your tale made me smile - it could've been me!"

Thanks, Dani!


Jody Thank you for the friend request, Taya! :)


message 6: by Dani

Dani Hi Taya,
Thanks for the friend request!
Your tale made me smile - it could've been me!


message 5: by Anish

Anish Kohli Glad to have you, Taya :)


message 4: by T.L.

T.L. Ash wrote: "Thank you for the friend request!"

Thank you for accepting!


Ash | EmeraldBookOwl Thank you for the friend request!


message 2: by T.L.

T.L. John wrote: "Hi T.L.!
Thanks for the friend request. I look forward to reading your books. They look really good!
John"

Hi John! Thanks for accepting and I hope you enjoy my work!


message 1: by John

John Hi T.L.!
Thanks for the friend request. I look forward to reading your books. They look really good!
John


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