Glen Engel-Cox

year in books

Glen Engel-Cox’s Followers (48)

member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
member photo
Mike
2,180 books | 125 friends

Adam
3,181 books | 1,543 friends

Paul
1,324 books | 1,361 friends

AT
AT
2,316 books | 143 friends

Eve
Eve
1,610 books | 113 friends

Peter T...
6,495 books | 293 friends

Gwen To...
1,543 books | 174 friends

Sioux
1,241 books | 109 friends

More friends…

Glen Engel-Cox

Goodreads Author


Born
in Victoria, Texas, The United States
August 09

Website

Twitter

Genre

Influences

Member Since
March 2008

URL


Glen Engel-Cox grew up in Texas, but left quickly, living in California, Malaysia, Ohio, Saudi Arabia, and Washington (both state and District of Columbia). He currently lives in Colorado and writes full-time.

Glen has had short stories published in Factor Four Magazine, SFS Stories, Today, Tomorrow, Always; Empyreone Flash Fiction; Alternate Presidents (edited by Mike Resnick); New Pathways; and from Roadkill Press. His compilation of three decades of writing about reading, First Impressions, was published in 2021. His first novel, Darwin’s Daughter, concerns the evolution of a young woman torn between science and religion. He's currently working on a near-future SF novel about energy and rural America as well as a thriller based on his exp
...more

To ask Glen Engel-Cox questions, please sign up.

Popular Answered Questions

Glen Engel-Cox One of the first questions I received after recently announcing the publication of my novel, Darwin's Daughter, was: How much of this is true? And I w…moreOne of the first questions I received after recently announcing the publication of my novel, Darwin's Daughter, was: How much of this is true? And I wasn't surprised by that question. It's a rare first novel that owes its existence too much removed from its author's life, mainly for the reason that as the first, you put so much of yourself into it. As I continue to work on successive books, I find myself moving farther away from myself, using more research and anecdotes discovered outside of my own experience. However, I do want to emphasize that Darwin's Daughter is a work of fiction, and while some of it contains traces of my personal history and experience, the main character is not me, and even the voyage of discovery is not mine.

Thus, while Joan Carter is from Texas and I'm from Texas, and grew up in a Baptist church (as did I), and is passionate about science (ditto), her love for science fairs is definitely something that I do not share. I entered the science fair once and did so poorly that I determined to never enter one again. Joan is single-minded in her focus on science; I flunked calculus in college and realized that my skills were more in line with words and presentations and logic rather than statistics and number-crunching.

The ideas, however, are strictly from my life. Everything in the book emerged from something that struck me as interesting, either because it happened to me, or I overheard it at a party, or I discovered it when I realized that I was going to have to do some background reading. For example, when I realized that I was going to need to effectively portray Joan's fascination with whiptail lizards, I undertook a study of recent scientific literature with a subspecies in New Mexico and Texas. Joan's personal background pivots around a particular piece of natural history to do with that subspecies of lizards and how they reproduce. As I mention in the acknowledgements, this was a discovery that occurred in the 1980s by a researcher named Crews. At a point as I was writing the novel, I came to the conclusion that I wanted to portray that discovery as Joan's, I contacted Dr. Crews to ask his permission, which he graciously gave. Because this is fiction, not fact. I could have made up a similar discovery, but this one worked seamlessly into my story and provided a verisimilitude that something I invented might not have accomplished.

Other aspects of the novel are modified from their real life counterparts. The game that Scott is credited with creating that enabled him to fund RE:evolution is based on Farmville; Scott himself is based somewhat on Richard Gariott, and RE:evolution owes a tiny bit the Ultima IV, leavened with a host of MMORPG concepts and ideas.

And, finally, the background research on the trip to the Galapagos itself was based on a trip I was lucky enough to take in 1996, along with some sailing in the Sea of Cortez I did in 2000. The lizard leap was based on an anecdote my wife told me about some herpetologists she hiked with once, and the scene with the turtle on the beach was something I have had the pleasure of seeing twice in my life, once in Costa Rica and just recently in Oman.

Back to the original question: How much of this is true? All of it is true, because it has been modified from its original sources to meet the needs of the story. But not all of it occurred, in that shape and form, in "real life," because Darwin's Daughter is a work of fiction, not autobiography.(less)
Average rating: 4.42 · 12 ratings · 5 reviews · 3 distinct worksSimilar authors
Darwin's Daughter: A Novel

4.63 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Today, Tomorrow, Always

by
3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
First Impressions: Dancing ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating

* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

The Ghost of You Lingers

My latest piece of flash fiction, "The Ghost of You Lingers," has just been published in the April 2022 edition of Factor Four Magazine, a free-to-read online magazine. Enjoy!
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Share on Twitter
Published on April 01, 2022 08:43 Tags: fiction, flash-fiction, science-fiction
Robert Silverberg...
Rate this book
Clear rating

 

Glen’s Recent Updates

Glen Engel-Cox rated a book it was amazing
Watchmen #1 by Alan Moore
Rate this book
Clear rating
Glen Engel-Cox rated a book it was amazing
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
Rate this book
Clear rating
One of the earliest books I can remember reading, and one that I’ve read again at least twice. If you haven’t read it (and I don’t know how you could have missed it if you are a reader, as it seems to be almost ubiquitous in English), then don’t dela ...more
"Here I am again thumbing my nose at that little bitch cancer as it runs away, whimpering.And just to clarify: No, I’m not in remission. I still have cancer. The level has dropped a tiny bit more—two points but it’s a drop. Cancer continues to retr..." Read more of this blog post »
Glen Engel-Cox wants to read
The Accidental Life by Terry McDonell
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Visit by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
"This is the first in a series of (it looks like) six novellas put out by Amazon under "Prime Reading", called as a group "Black Stars."

Adiche is a brilliant writer, author of books like _Purple Hibiscus_ and _Americanah_ and lecturer whose Ted video " Read more of this review »
Universal Harvester by John Darnielle
"Based on reviews, I think I should explain how I came to read this book.
1) People recommended it as fine horror. In particular, for the cosmic horror subgenre.
2) Marketing and production second #1.
3) I have not read the author's previous book.
4) I do" Read more of this review »
Glen Engel-Cox rated a book really liked it
Driving Over Lemons by Chris  Stewart
Rate this book
Clear rating
Like Peter Mayle’s A Year in Provence, this is not really a travelogue or travel writing although that’s typically how both books are marketed. Instead, these are expat stories: anecdotes about foreigners who decide to try and make their home in a f ...more
The Best of Joe R. Lansdale by Joe R. Lansdale
" I second Dbdude99's recommendation for "Night They Missed the Horror Show," one of the best horror short stories I can think of, and I'm including Shi ...more "
Glen Engel-Cox is currently reading
Driving Over Lemons by Chris  Stewart
Rate this book
Clear rating
Glen Engel-Cox entered a giveaway
Born for Trouble by Joe R. Lansdale
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Glen's books…
Edward Bryant
“One might well think of ["Going Mobile" by Glen Engel-Cox] as a Carol Emshwiller or Connie Willis story...with balls.”
Edward Bryant

William Faulkner
“Read, read, read. Read everything -- trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You'll absorb it.
Then write. If it's good, you'll find out. If it's not, throw it out of the window.”
William Faulkner

Dorothy Parker
“I like to have a martini,
Two at the very most.
After three I'm under the table,
after four I'm under my host.”
Dorothy Parker, The Collected Dorothy Parker

E.E. Cummings
“Damn everything but the circus! ...damn everything that is grim, dull, motionless, unrisking, inward turning, damn everything that won't get into the circle, that won't enjoy. That won't throw it's heart into the tension, surprise, fear and delight of the circus, the round world, the full existence...”
E.E. Cummings

Vladimir Nabokov
“Style and Structure are the essence of a book; great ideas are hogwash.

Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Interview in Writers at Work(Fourth Series, ed. by George Plimpton, 1976).”
Vladimir Nabokov

177 iFanboy.com — 130 members — last activity Nov 28, 2011 08:30PM
This group is dedicated to the shared interest of comics, graphic novels, and trade paperbacks.
2281 Magic Realism — 886 members — last activity Jun 18, 2020 12:27AM
Magic realism is a global and varied mode of literature, from the early twentieth century European works which made the everyday seem magical, to the ...more



Comments (showing 1-2)    post a comment »
dateUp arrow    newest »

message 2: by Peter

Peter Tillman Glen: Thanks for the friend invite! Good to catch up with another old-timer. I'll have to catch up on your reviews, and I see you've done some writing as well. I was active at rasfw back in the day so we may have crossed paths there & then.
Cheers -- Pete Tillman


message 1: by Jaree

Jaree Francis Hope all's well

- Jay


back to top