Stephen Wolfram


Born
in London, The United Kingdom
August 29, 1959


Stephen Wolfram's parents were Jewish refugees who emigrated from Germany to England in the 1930s. Wolfram's father Hugo was a textile manufacturer and novelist (Into a Neutral Country) and his mother Sybil was a professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford. He has a younger brother, Conrad. Wolfram is married to a mathematician and has four children.

He was educated at Eton College, but claimed to be bored and left it prematurely in 1976. He entered St John's College, Oxford at age 17 but found lectures "awful", and left in 1978 without graduating. He received a Ph.D. in particle physics from the California Institute of Technology at age 20,[8] joined the faculty there and received one of the first MacArthur awards in 1981, at age 21
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Average rating: 3.65 · 2,748 ratings · 230 reviews · 30 distinct worksSimilar authors
A New Kind of Science

3.59 avg rating — 1,954 ratings — published 1997 — 5 editions
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Idea Makers: Personal Persp...

3.60 avg rating — 379 ratings4 editions
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Computation and the Future ...

3.95 avg rating — 77 ratings2 editions
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Adventures of a Computation...

3.75 avg rating — 84 ratings — published 2019 — 3 editions
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An Elementary Introduction ...

4.21 avg rating — 78 ratings — published 2015 — 4 editions
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The Mathematica Book

4.28 avg rating — 46 ratings — published 1999 — 4 editions
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On the Quest for Computable...

4.03 avg rating — 29 ratings2 editions
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How to Teach Computational ...

3.61 avg rating — 18 ratings
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Cellular Automata And Compl...

3.68 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 1994 — 3 editions
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Mathematica: A System for D...

3.80 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1988 — 4 editions
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“It's always seemed like a big mystery how nature, seemingly so effortlessly, manages to produce so much that seems to us so complex. Well, I think we found its secret. It's just sampling what's out there in the computational universe.”
Stephen Wolfram

“It is perhaps a little humbling to discover that we as humans are in effect computationally no more capable than cellular automata with very simple rules. But the Principle of Computational Equivalence also implies that the same is ultimately true of our whole universe.

So while science has often made it seem that we as humans are somehow insignificant compared to the universe, the Principle of Computational Equivalence now shows that in a certain sense we are at the same level as it is. For the principle implies that what goes on inside us can ultimately achieve just the same level of computational sophistication as our whole universe.”
Stephen Wolfram, A New Kind of Science

“I'm committed to seeing this project done. To see if within this decade we can finally hold in our hands the rule for our universe, and know where our universe lies in the space of all possible universes.”
Stephen Wolfram

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