Paul Lafargue





Paul Lafargue


Born
in Santiago de Cuba, Cuba
June 16, 1842

Died
November 02, 1911

Genre


French revolutionary Marxist socialist and Karl Marx's son-in-law.Lafargue was born in Cuba to French and Creole parents. Karl Marx even once reffered to him by the n-word.

Lafargue his main work was called the right to be lazy. In which he calls upon not only the right to work, but also the right to be lazy. At the beginning of that book he claimed that the African slaves lived under better circumstances than the European worker.

At 69 he died together with his wife Laura in a suicide pact.


Average rating: 3.65 · 1,535 ratings · 116 reviews · 58 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Right to Be Lazy

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3.65 avg rating — 1,448 ratings — published 1880 — 102 editions
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The Religion Of Capital: A ...

4.21 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1887 — 9 editions
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The Evolution of Property f...

3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1895 — 12 editions
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The Right to Be Lazy: And O...

3.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2010 — 11 editions
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Karl Marx: The Man

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1926
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Derecho de La Pereza-Mito d...

3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings
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Social and Philosophical St...

3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2013 — 7 editions
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¿Por qué cree en Dios la bu...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2013
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La Légende de Victor Hugo

2.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1885 — 9 editions
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Η χρεοκοπία του καπιταλισμού

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings
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More books by Paul Lafargue…
“Work, work, proletarians, to increase social wealth and your individual poverty; work, work, in order that becoming poorer, you may have more reason to work and become miserable. Such is the inexorable law of capitalist production.”
Paul Lafargue, The Right to Be Lazy

“O Laziness, mother of the arts and noble virtues, be thou the balm of human anguish.”
Paul Lafargue, The Right to Be Lazy

“In proportion as the mass of citizens who possess political rights increases, and the number of elected ruler’s increases, the actual power is concentrated and becomes the monopoly of a smaller and smaller group of individuals.”
Paul Lafargue