Dan Hurley


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Average rating: 3.61 · 974 ratings · 149 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Smarter: The New Science of...

3.49 avg rating — 734 ratings — published 2013 — 11 editions
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Diabetes Rising: How a Rare...

4.04 avg rating — 146 ratings — published 2010 — 7 editions
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Natural Causes: Death, Lies...

3.91 avg rating — 80 ratings — published 2006 — 5 editions
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The 60-Second Novelist: Wha...

3.38 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 1999 — 3 editions
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A Funny Thing Happened

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2012
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More books by Dan Hurley…
“I’ve now interviewed a couple hundred researchers in the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Japan, and China. I visited Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where I met brain-injured veterans. I went to the San Francisco offices of Lumosity, the biggest online provider of these cognitive games aimed at improving intelligence. And I met twice with the guy who leads the funding in this area at the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, or IARPA. It’s a government intelligence agency, like DARPA for spies.”
Dan Hurley, Smarter: The New Science of Building Brain Power

“After weaning, the only food proved to enhance cognition is coffee. It’s not just that the caffeine in coffee is a stimulant; a study published in the journal Neuropharmacology in January 2013 found that caffeine improves working memory in middle-aged men independent of its stimulating effect. It’s not just the caffeine that’s beneficial, either; another study, published that same month in the journal Age, found that the working memory of elderly rats fed coffee showed significantly more improvements than those fed caffeine alone. And the benefits of coffee last far longer than the couple of hours during which its effects can be felt;”
Dan Hurley, Smarter: The New Science of Building Brain Power

“as more attention is given to distinguishing between pinpoint differences in touch, sound, or sight, the area of the brain devoted to that distinction expands and, in the process, gets better at it.”
Dan Hurley, Smarter: The New Science of Building Brain Power



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