J. Sakai



Average rating: 4.18 · 596 ratings · 90 reviews · 12 distinct worksSimilar authors
Settlers: The Mythology of ...

4.22 avg rating — 475 ratings — published 1983 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Green Nazi - an investi...

4.04 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2002
Rate this book
Clear rating
Learning from an Unimportan...

4.17 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 2015
Rate this book
Clear rating
Basic Politics of Movement ...

by
3.90 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
The "Dangerous Class" and R...

4.40 avg rating — 10 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Beginner's Kata : uncensore...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 5 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Shock of Recognition

3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
The “Dangerous Class” and R...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
When Race Burns Class: Sett...

by
3.97 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 2000 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Settlers: The Mythology of ...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by J. Sakai…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“There was major u.s. imperialist support for Italian, Spanish and German fascism before and even during World War II, as opposed to support for fascism at home. Fascism was distinct from racism or white supremacy, which were only "as American as apple pie."
Neither the ruling class nor the white masses had any real need for fascism. What for? There was no class deadlock paralyzing society. There already was a longstanding, thinly disguised settler dictatorship over the colonial proletariat in North America. In the u.s. settlerism made fascism unnecessary. However good or bad the economic situation was, white settlers were getting the best of what was available. Which was why both the white Left and white Far Right alike back then in the 1930s were patriotic and pro-American. Now only the white Left is.
The white Left here is behind in understanding fascism. When they're not using the word loosely and rhetorically to mean any repression at all (like the frequent assertions that cutting welfare is "fascism"! I mean, give us a break!), they're still reciting their favorite formula that the fascists are only the "pawns of the ruling class". No, that was Nazism in Germany, maybe, though even there that's not a useful way of looking at it. But definitely not here, not in that old way.
The main problem hasn't been fascism in the old sense – it's been neocolonialism and bourgeois democracy! The bourgeoisie didn't need any fascism at all to put Leonard Peltier away in maximum security for life or Mumia on death row. They hunted down the Black Panthers and the American Indian Movement like it was deer hunting season, while white America went shopping at the mall – all without needing fascism. And the steady waterfall of patriarchal violence against women, of rapes and torture and killings and very effective terrorism on a mass scale, should remind us that the multitude of reactionary men have "equal opportunity" under "democracy", too.”
J. Sakai, When Race Burns Class: Settlers Revisited

“Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels saw that the “mean whites” (as they called them) of the South were hopeless politically. They felt that nothing could be done with them but to render them powerless until they died out of old age. This was not a unique observation. Wendell Phillips, the great Radical abolitionist, bluntly pleaded in 1870: “Now is the time … to guarantee the South against the possible domination or the anger of the white race. We adhere to our opinion that nothing, or not much, except hostility, can be expected of two-thirds of the adult white men. They will go to their graves unchanged. No one of them should ever again be trusted with political rights. And all the elemental power of civilization should be combined and brought into play to counterwork the anger and plots of such foes.”
J. Sakai, Settlers: The Mythology of the White Proletariat from Mayflower to Modern

“This liberal intellectual polarity that "race issues" and "class issues" are opposites, are completely separate from each other, and that one or the other must be the main thing, is utterly useless! We have to really get it that race issues aren't the opposite of class issues. That race is always so electrically charged, so filled with mass power, precisely because it's about raw class. That's why revolutionaries and demagogues can both potentially tap into so much power using it. Or get burned.
You can't steer yourself in real politics, not in amerikkka and not in this global imperialism, without understanding race. "Class" without race in North America is an abstraction. And vice-versa. Those who do not get this are always just led around by the nose, the manipulated without a clue – and it is true that many don't want any more from life than this. But wising up on race only means seeing all the class issues that define race and charge it with meaning. Why should it be so hard to understand that capitalism, which practically wants to barcode our assholes, has always found it convenient to color-code its classes?”
J. Sakai, When Race Burns Class: Settlers Revisited



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite J. to Goodreads.