Elliot Clark



Average rating: 4.51 · 515 ratings · 96 reviews · 7 distinct worksSimilar authors
Evangelism as Exiles: Life ...

4.51 avg rating — 435 ratings — published 2019 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Evangelism as Exiles: Life ...

4.54 avg rating — 78 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Hunting Humans

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2015
Rate this book
Clear rating
Farewell To A King

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Art of Process Control

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
A Wilder Kingdom

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2015
Rate this book
Clear rating
A Five

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2015
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Elliot Clark…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“The time is coming, and is here now, when the world won’t listen to our gospel simply because they respect us. However, they might listen if we respect them. Because how can we expect homosexuals to believe our concern for God’s created order when we don’t dignify them as people made in his image? How can we call our coworkers to submit to Christ as Lord when they don’t see us gladly and respectfully submitting to our boss? How can we tell of God’s love for the world when we exhibit disdain and revulsion toward our neighbors? How can we demonstrate a Christ-like compassion for our enemies when all they hear from us is concern for our rights and privileges? To honor others is to have a genuine care and concern for them. So this is what we must do—even for those who have no concern for us.”
Elliot Clark, Evangelism as Exiles: Life on Mission As Strangers In Our Own Land

“Far too often we're a happy and hope-filled people as long as our churches are prospering, as long as we have a seat at the cultural and political table. But it's highly unlikely we'll invite the world--other races and creeds and lifestyles--around our own kitchen table.  We're of the world but somehow not in it.”
Elliot Clark, Evangelism as Exiles: Life on Mission As Strangers In Our Own Land

“We must recognize that the apologetic force of our preaching isn’t always that our message is more believable than another, but that it’s more desirable. In evangelism, we don’t simply make a logical case, but a doxological one. We aren’t just talking to brains. We’re speaking to hearts that have desires and eyes that look for beauty. We’re not merely trying to convince people that our gospel is true, but that our God is good. Over the years I’ve tried to move away from cold, structured arguments into exultations of praise. From giving evidence for the resurrection to reveling in its glory. From merely explaining why Jesus is needed to showing why he should be wanted. From defending the Bible’s truthfulness to rejoicing in its sweetness. Preaching the gospel requires propositional truths. Believing the gospel requires historical facts. But when we preach, others should see how those facts have changed our lives. They should hear us singing with the Negro slaves, “I’ve found a Savior, and he’s sweet, I know.” They need to feel the weight of glory. That’s because believing the gospel—like preaching it—is worship. Which makes praise integral to our preaching and turns our priestly ministry into delight!”
Elliot Clark, Evangelism as Exiles: Life on Mission As Strangers In Our Own Land



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Elliot to Goodreads.