Gretta Vosper

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Gretta Vosper

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Influences
John Shelby Spong; Lloyd Geering; Sam Harris

Member Since
May 2013

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Gretta Vosper I'm not sure I've ever had writer's block excepting when I've been given an outline and I've had to try to write to it. Since I learned to ignore the…moreI'm not sure I've ever had writer's block excepting when I've been given an outline and I've had to try to write to it. Since I learned to ignore the outline, I've not had any difficulties writing. That said, the sheer physical and mental challenge of writing a book has kept me from planning another one. Maybe that is a writer's block of a sort. But if someone gave me a topic and asked me to write on it, I'd likely be very tempted if it was one I thought I had something to say about! (less)
Gretta Vosper Oh my goodness!! My apologies for not answering this sooner. I need to figure out notifications!
No. I cannot say that writing my books took courage if…more
Oh my goodness!! My apologies for not answering this sooner. I need to figure out notifications!
No. I cannot say that writing my books took courage if you are referring to content. The content of my books was not new to me and had not emerged in a vacuum. It was the product of years of a vibrant, reflective, and mutually challenging relationship with a a congregation. So I was confident that the material, encountered and affirmed in theological college and refined within the practical realities of a congregation was what needed to be written.
The courage, as every author likely knows, is in offering one's work to the world and being willing to accept the world's judgment of it. And that remains the most challenging part.(less)
Average rating: 3.84 · 189 ratings · 37 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
With or Without God: Why th...

3.68 avg rating — 119 ratings — published 2008 — 5 editions
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Amen: what prayer can mean ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 2012
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Amen: What Prayer Can Mean ...

4.29 avg rating — 17 ratings4 editions
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Time or Too Late: Chasing t...

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Amen

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013
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With or Without God

did not like it 1.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2009
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We All Breathe (Breath: Poe...

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Women v. Religion: The Case...

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More books by Gretta Vosper…

If you do not have the courage

Over the years of my “heresy trial”, it was important that I find and nurture many ways to protect my heart. It was hard work but I was buoyed by those at West Hill and beyond who provided their constant support and expressions of appreciation for the work I’ve been privileged to do because of my courageous congregation. I receive emails filled with vitriol and try to respond with respect. Some...

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Published on June 26, 2019 12:04

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Gretta’s Recent Updates

Healology by Criss Jami
“As for the majority, it is not so much race as it is political affiliation that really divides it today. What was once an issue of physical difference is now one of intellectual difference. Men have yet to master disagreeing without flashing all their frustrations that come with it; the conservative will throw half-truths while the liberal will throw insults. Combine these and what do you get? A dishonest mockery of a country.”
Criss Jami
4513718
“If science could comprehend all phenomena so that eventually in a thoroughly rational society human beings became as predictable as cogs in a machine, then man, driven by this need to know and assert his freedom, would rise up and smash the machine.

What the reformers of the Enlightenment, dreaming of a perfect organization of society, had overlooked, Dostoevski saw all too plainly with the novelist's eye: namely, that as modern society becomes more organized and hence more bureaucratized it piles up at its joints petty figures like that of the Underground Man, who beneath their nondescript surface are monsters of frustration and resentment.”
William Barrett
We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates
“And I know that there are black boys and black girls out there lost in a Bermuda triangle of the mind or stranded in the doldrums of America, some of them treading and some of them drowning, never feeling and never forgetting. The most precious thing I had then is the most precious thing I have now—my own curiosity. That is the thing I knew, even in the classroom, they could not take from me. That is the thing that buoyed me and eventually plucked me from the sea.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates
Gretta Vosper rated a book it was amazing
Atomic Habits by James Clear
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I loved this book. Purchased because I've been a subscriber to his newsletter for some time, I thought I'd know a lot of it already. But that was so not the case. Here, James has provided excellent stories to illustrate the importance of every single ...more
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Rage Becomes Her by Soraya Chemaly
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Bridge of Clay by Markus Zusak
Bridge of Clay
by Markus Zusak (Goodreads Author)
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The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
The Book Thief
by Markus Zusak (Goodreads Author)
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A luminous read. I use passages when presiding over funerals or memorials for people whose hearts were large and whose lives were given away in loving. The writing is simply exquisite.
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The Tiger's Wife by Téa Obreht
The Tiger's Wife
by Téa Obreht (Goodreads Author)
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A feast for your heart. Brilliant writing and originality. A pleasure to savour.
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The Tiger's Wife by Téa Obreht
The Tiger's Wife
by Téa Obreht (Goodreads Author)
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A feast for your heart. Brilliant writing and originality. A pleasure to savour.
Gretta Vosper finished reading
Convictions by Marcus J. Borg
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More of Gretta's books…
“It is time for humanists and atheists, skeptics and agnostics to see they share a common future with the many who are still comforted by their religious beliefs.”
Gretta Vosper, With or Without God: Why the Way We Live is More Important Than What We Believe

“Now, personally, I don’t really get the “tell me you love me or I’ll send you to hell” message such preaching promotes. If demonstrations of love to my husband were the result of threats he’d made to my well-being, I’d recognize him as an abusive brute and also be thinking he was some sort of twisted if he really thought the “love” he got through such intimidation was of any value or meaning. If we believed in a benevolent Creator of the Universe, we would be even more surprised at such behaviour, yet it continues, to this day, to be a significant characteristic of the Christian deity.”
Gretta Vosper, Amen: what prayer can mean in a world beyond belief

“Religion is a communal way of reimagining and remaking the self and the world. It is what we are to live by and what we are to live for. … [W]e need religion as much as ever. We need it as human, value-creating activity.”
Gretta Vosper, Amen: What Prayer Can Mean in a World Beyond Belief

“I never said that other one, about love being two people being stupid. I would never say anything like that. I don't know where that came from and I can't erase it.”
Brian Armstrong

“Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They're not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can't do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.”
Rob Siltanen

“So many words get lost. They leave the mouth and lose their courage, wandering aimlessly until they are swept into the gutter like dead leaves. On rainy days, you can hear their chorus rushing past: IwasabeautifulgirlPleasedon’tgoItoobelievemybodyismadeofglass-I’veneverlovedanyoneIthinkofmyselfasfunnyForgiveme….

There was a time when it wasn’t uncommon to use a piece of string to guide words that otherwise might falter on the way to their destinations. Shy people carried a little bunch of string in their pockets, but people considered loudmouths had no less need for it, since those used to being overheard by everyone were often at a loss for how to make themselves heard by someone. The physical distance between two people using a string was often small; sometimes the smaller the distance, the greater the need for the string.

The practice of attaching cups to the ends of string came much later. Some say it is related to the irrepressible urge to press shells to our ears, to hear the still-surviving echo of the world’s first expression. Others say it was started by a man who held the end of a string that was unraveled across the ocean by a girl who left for America.

When the world grew bigger, and there wasn’t enough string to keep the things people wanted to say from disappearing into the vastness, the telephone was invented.

Sometimes no length of string is long enough to say the thing that needs to be said. In such cases all the string can do, in whatever its form, is conduct a person’s silence.”
Nicole Krauss, The History of Love

“Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

“In life's most difficult situations, it is our capacity to cope and personal resiliency that are put to the ultimate test. It's then that the freedom to choose our attitude takes center stage. To exercise this freedom effectively, however, we must be able to view any given situation from different vantage points. We must know we are and be flexible and courageous enough to make a shift when necessary, even if it means moving away from what is expected or considered "normal.”
Alex Pattakos, Prisoners of Our Thoughts: Viktor Frankl's Principles for Discovering Meaning in Life and Work

237556 Silent World — A discussion group — 869 members — last activity Nov 01, 2019 06:21PM
A place to discuss all the unique aspects of Deaf culture as highlighted in the thriller Silent Fear (A novel inspired by true crimes) by Lance & ...more



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