György Buzsáki



Average rating: 4.27 · 263 ratings · 13 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Rhythms of the Brain

4.26 avg rating — 198 ratings — published 2006 — 5 editions
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The Brain from Inside Out

4.32 avg rating — 62 ratings2 editions
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Micro-, Meso- and Macro-Dyn...

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Synaptic Plasticity in the ...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1987 — 4 editions
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Daedalus 144:1 (Winter 2015...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2015
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“brain is not an information-absorbing, perpetual coding device, as it is often portrayed, but a venture-seeking explorer, an action-obsessed agent constantly controlling the body’s actuators and sensors to test its hypotheses. The brain ceaselessly interacts with, rather than just detects, the external world in order to remain itself. It is through such exploration that correlations and interactions acquire meaning and become information (Chapter 5). Brains do not process information: they create it.”
György Buzsáki, The Brain from Inside Out

“Next, we discussed the relationship between the tabula rasa (blank slate) and preconfigured brain models. In the empiricist outside-in model, the brain starts out as blank paper onto which new information is cumulatively written. Modification of brain circuits scales with the amount of newly learned knowledge by juxtaposition and superposition. A contrasting view is that the brain is a dictionary with preexisting internal dynamics and syntactical rules but filled with initially nonsense neuronal words. A large reservoir of unique neuronal patterns has the potential to acquire significance for the animal through exploratory action and represents a distinct event or situation. In this alternative model, the diversity of brain components, such as firing rates, synaptic connection strengths, and the magnitude of collective behavior of neurons, leads to wide distributions. The two tails of this distribution offer complementary advantages: the “good-enough” brain can generalize and act fast; the “precision” brain is slow but careful and offers needed details in many situations.”
György Buzsáki, The Brain from Inside Out

“Where do the behavioral-cognitive concepts that contemporary cognitive neuroscience operates with come from? The answer is from Aristotle and his heart-centered philosophy, not brain mechanisms. Aristotle’s terms were adopted by the Christian philosophers and were extensively used by both Descartes and the British empiricists John Locke and David Hume. To their credit, they used many of the cognitive expressions only as hypothetical constructs.”
György Buzsáki, Rhythms of the Brain



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