Jimmy Akin

Jimmy Akin


Born
Corpus Christi, Texas, The United States
Website

Twitter

Genre


Jimmy Akin (b. 1965) was born in Texas, grew up nominally Protestant, but at age 20 experienced a profound conversion to Christ. Planning on becoming a Protestant pastor or seminary professor, he started an intensive study of the Bible. But the more he immersed himself in Scripture the more he found to support the Catholic faith. Eventually, he was compelled in conscience to enter the Catholic Church, which he did in 1992. His conversion story, "A Triumph and a Tragedy," is published in Surprised by Truth. Besides being an author, Jimmy is a Senior Apologist at Catholic Answers, a contributing editor to This Rock magazine, and a weekly guest on "Catholic Answers Live."

Jimmy Akin isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but he does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from his feed.

So you know that UGLY statue of John Paul II they have outside Rome's main train termnal?


You know, the one that looks like this . . . ?


JOHN PAUL II STATUE


The artist who designed it is now blaming the foundry that executed his design and saying that they're going to fix it.


I'm not holding my breath.


GET THE STORY.


 



Read more of this blog post »
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on January 12, 2012 20:24 • 154 views
Average rating: 4.29 · 2,021 ratings · 122 reviews · 27 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Fathers Know Best: Your...

by
4.44 avg rating — 210 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Salvation Controversy

by
4.07 avg rating — 68 ratings — published 2001
Rate this book
Clear rating
Cracking the Da Vinci Code

3.65 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 2004
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Drama of Salvation: How...

4.29 avg rating — 42 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Mass Revision: How the Litu...

4.08 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
A Daily Defense: 365 Days (...

4.32 avg rating — 34 ratings2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Justification by Faith and ...

4.53 avg rating — 15 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Pope Names: The Definitive ...

4.24 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Nightmare World of Jack...

by
4.08 avg rating — 13 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
20 Answers- Salvation (20 A...

4.89 avg rating — 9 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Jimmy Akin…
Justification by Faith and ...
(1 book)
by
4.53 avg rating — 15 ratings

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Statues of Saints CHALLENGE “The Catholic use of statues of saints is idolatry.” DEFENSE Idolatry involves worshipping a statue as a god. That's not what Catholics do with statues. Statues of saints do not represent gods. They represent human beings or angels united with God in heaven. Even the least learned practicing Catholics are aware that statues of saints are not gods, and neither are the saints they represent. If you point to a statue of the Virgin Mary and ask, “Is this a goddess?” or “Is the Virgin Mary a goddess?” you should receive the answer “no” in both cases. If this is the case for the Virgin Mary, the same will be true of any saint. As long as one is not confusing a statue with a god, it is not an idol, and the commandment against idolatry is not violated. This was true in the Bible. At various points, God commanded the Israelites to make statues and images for religious use. For example, in the book of Numbers the Israelites were suffering from a plague of poisonous snakes, and God commanded Moses to make a bronze serpent and set it on a pole so that those bitten by the snakes could gaze upon the bronze serpent and live (Num. 21:6–9). The act of looking at a statue has no natural power to heal, so this was a religious use. It was only when, centuries later, people began to regard the statue as a god that it was being used as an idol and so was destroyed (2 Kings 18:4). God also commanded that his temple, which represented heaven, be filled with images of the inhabitants of heaven. Thus he originally ordered that craftsmen work images of cherubim (a kind of angel) into curtains of the Tent of Meeting (Exod. 26:1). Later, carvings of cherubim were made on the walls and doors of the temple (1 Kings 6:29–35). Statues were also made. The lid of the Ark of the Covenant included two statues of cherubim that spread their wings toward each other (Exod. 25:18–20), and the temple included giant, fifteen-foot tall statues of cherubim in the holy of holies (1 Kings 6:23–28). Since the Ascension of Christ, the saints have joined the angels in heaven (CCC 1023), making images of them in church appropriate as well.”
Jimmy Akin, A Daily Defense: 365 Days ( plus one) to Becoming a Better Apologist

“[She believes] in one God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven, and earth, and the sea, and all things that are in them; and in one Christ Jesus, the Son of God [Against Heresies 1:10:1 (c. A.D. 189)].”
Jimmy Akin, The Fathers Know Best: Your Essential Guide to the Teachings of the Early Church

“This is essential: the Christian ethic is not born from a system of commandments but is a consequence of our friendship with Christ. This friendship influences life; if it is true it incarnates and fulfills itself in love for neighbor. For this reason, any ethical decay is not limited to the individual sphere but it also weakens personal and communal faith from which it derives and on which it has a crucial effect. Therefore let us allow ourselves to be touched by reconciliation, which God has given us in Christ, by God’s “foolish” love for us; nothing and no one can ever separate us from his love (cf. Rom. 8:39). We live in this certainty. It is this certainty that gives us the strength to live concretely the faith that works in love.”
Jimmy Akin, The Drama of Salvation: How God Rescues You from Your Sins and Brings You to Eternal Life



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Jimmy to Goodreads.