Tom Quinn



Average rating: 3.79 · 1,599 ratings · 159 reviews · 85 distinct worksSimilar authors
Backstairs Billy: The Life ...

3.44 avg rating — 297 ratings — published 2015
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London's Strangest Tales: E...

3.68 avg rating — 317 ratings — published 2008 — 10 editions
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Cocoa At Midnight

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3.77 avg rating — 167 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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Flu: A Social History of In...

3.36 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 2008 — 3 editions
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Mrs Keppel: Mistress to the...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 27 ratings2 editions
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The Book of Forgotten Craft...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2011
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London's Truly Strangest Tales

4.33 avg rating — 12 ratings2 editions
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The Whisky Companion

4.10 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2006
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Fishing's Strangest Days: E...

3.36 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2002 — 4 editions
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The Reluctant Billionaire: ...

2.92 avg rating — 12 ratings2 editions
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“There is no great religion without a great schism. All of them have it. And that's because you're dealing with something called faith. And faith is not something you can prove; faith is personal opinion. Uh, when you're dealing with something with certainty, like, y'know, science or logic, you don't have the--there's no wiggle room; that's why history is not filled with warring math cults, y'know, because you can settle the issue; you can prove something to be right or wrong, and that's the end of the argument: next case. Whereas, when you're dealing with faith, you can forever argue your point, or another point, because you're dealing with intangibles. Personally, I think, faith is what you ask of somebody when you don't have the goods to prove your point.”
Tom Quinn

“The English upper classes were regular churchgoers but they allowed children to work for sixteen hours a day in mines and factories. They insisted their wives and daughters were too delicate for work, yet their twelve-year-old maids worked eighty and more hours each week. It was a world that started a revolution”
Tom Quinn, Mrs Keppel: Mistress to the King

“So long as a man appeared to be respectable he could do as he pleased.”
Tom Quinn, Mrs Keppel: Mistress to the King

Topics Mentioning This Author

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The Book Vipers: Bookbuster Challenge Book Lists 174 166 Dec 31, 2017 09:05AM  
The Book Vipers: * Last book(s) you acquired 1288 472 Jun 03, 2018 02:45AM  


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