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David Zweig

Goodreads Author


Born
The United States
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Member Since
October 2008

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Average rating: 3.61 · 461 ratings · 91 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
Invisibles: The Power of An...

3.63 avg rating — 438 ratings — published 2014 — 10 editions
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Swimming Inside the Sun

3.22 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2009
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One Square Inch o...
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David’s Recent Updates

David Zweig liked a quote
Ways of Seeing by John Berger
“A woman must continually watch herself. She is almost continually accompanied by her own image of herself. Whilst she is walking across a room or whilst she is weeping at the death of her father, she can scarcely avoid envisaging herself walking or weeping. From earliest childhood she has been taught and persuaded to survey herself continually. And so she comes to consider the surveyor and the surveyed within her as the two constituent yet always distinct elements of her identity as a woman. She has to survey everything she is and everything she does because how she appears to men, is of crucial importance for what is normally thought of as the success of her life. Her own sense of being in herself is supplanted by a sense of being appreciated as herself by another....

One might simplify this by saying: men act and women appear. Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at. This determines not only most relations between men and women but also the relation of women to them
...more
John Berger
A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
" Great review. I appreciate the snow globe comment, and your reaction to the final chapter. "
David Zweig rated a book really liked it
A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
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Egan writes with staggering skill. Goon Squad is a true ensemble cast; just when you think one character is breaking out as the lead the narrative shifts to someone else. And yet - here's the staggering skill part - every character, even the ones wit ...more
David Zweig is currently reading
One Square Inch of Silence by Gordon Hempton
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David Zweig has read
The Ask by Sam Lipsyte
The Ask
by Sam Lipsyte (Goodreads Author)
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Swimming Inside the Sun by David     Zweig
" Dear MyFleshSingsOut, AKA
goodreads.com/joshingthyself AKA
joshingthyself on myspace,

It's hilarious and bizarre how much time you're spending detailing
...more "
Swimming Inside the Sun by David     Zweig
"I read the galley of this book. The woman who works at the publishing company who sent me this book did so because she’d noticed that I have enjoyed Dave Eggers ‘s work (which she thought has some similarity to this author’s) and I did really love..." Read more of this review »
Swimming Inside the Sun by David     Zweig
" Dear Jason,
Thank you for reading half of my novel, and for taking the time to review it. There are several points in your review that I'd like to addr
...more "
David Zweig rated a book it was amazing
What Is the What by Dave Eggers
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More of David's books…
“perhaps it’s philosophy that best explains why savoring responsibility leads to fulfillment. The model of happiness perpetuated by the cultural juggernauts of Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and Disneyesque fairy tales of everyday effervescence, broad-smiled contentedness, and perfect relationships is a historically anomalous, and for most, unachievable state. In contrast, we shall return to eudaimonia, the classical Greek concept of happiness that essentially means the “flourishing” or “rich” life. With their devotion to training, meticulousness, and desire for quiet power and accountability, Invisibles understand the value of a life not necessarily of the moment-to-moment happiness that many mistakenly strive for, but of an overall richness of experience, a life grounded in eudaimonic values.”
David Zweig, Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion

“an oft-cited 2010 study on self-esteem, its authors found that college students would rather receive praise than have sex. A”
David Zweig, Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion

“In fact, Invisibles are found in all walks of life. What binds them is their approach—deriving satisfaction from the value of their work, not the volume of their praise.”
David Zweig, Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion

Topics Mentioning This Author

“A woman must continually watch herself. She is almost continually accompanied by her own image of herself. Whilst she is walking across a room or whilst she is weeping at the death of her father, she can scarcely avoid envisaging herself walking or weeping. From earliest childhood she has been taught and persuaded to survey herself continually. And so she comes to consider the surveyor and the surveyed within her as the two constituent yet always distinct elements of her identity as a woman. She has to survey everything she is and everything she does because how she appears to men, is of crucial importance for what is normally thought of as the success of her life. Her own sense of being in herself is supplanted by a sense of being appreciated as herself by another....

One might simplify this by saying: men act and women appear. Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at. This determines not only most relations between men and women but also the relation of women to themselves. The surveyor of woman in herself is male: the surveyed female. Thus she turns herself into an object -- and most particularly an object of vision: a sight.”
John Berger, Ways of Seeing




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