Dorothy Wickenden


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The United States
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Dorothy Wickenden became the Executive Editor of The New Yorker in January 1996. She joined the magazine as Managing Editor in March 1995. She also writes for the magazine and is the moderator of its weekly podcast "The Political Scene." Wickenden is on the faculty of The Writers' Institute at CUNY's Graduate Center, where she teaches a course on narrative nonfiction.

Previously, Wickenden was National Affairs Editor at Newsweek from 1993 - 1995. Before that, she spent fifteen years at The New Republic, first as Managing Editor and later as Executive Editor. She edited “The New Republic Reader: 80 Years of Opinion and Debate” (Basic Books, 1994), an anthology of New Republic pieces. Ms. Wickenden has also written for The New Yorker, The Wall
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Average rating: 3.41 · 6,098 ratings · 1,356 reviews · 4 distinct worksSimilar authors
Nothing Daunted: The Unexpe...

3.41 avg rating — 6,093 ratings — published 2011 — 9 editions
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The New Republic Reader: Ei...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1973 — 3 editions
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The Agitators: Three Friend...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — expected publication 2021 — 5 editions
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“A freshman had to wear a black turtleneck sweater, corduroy trousers, and a little black cap called a ‘dink’ on the back of his head,” he wrote in his autobiography, Confessions of a Maverick”
Dorothy Wickenden, Nothing Daunted: The Unexpected Education of Two Society Girls in the West

“[Harriet Tubman] also looked out for other African-Americans in town, opening the first home in the country for elderly and indigent blacks. When Dorothy and Ros were small, the elderly Tubman rode a bicycle up and down South Street, stopping to ask for food donations. If she had specific needs, she sat on the back porch and waited for the lady of the house, with whom she would chat and ask for bedding or clothing for her residents. One of Ros's nieces said, "Mother had coffee with Harriet and would always leave a ham or turkey for her for the holiday.”
Dorothy Wickenden, Nothing Daunted: The Unexpected Education of Two Society Girls in the West



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