Jane Gleeson-White





Jane Gleeson-White



Average rating: 3.52 · 608 ratings · 123 reviews · 9 distinct worksSimilar authors
Double Entry: How the Merch...

3.44 avg rating — 502 ratings — published 2011 — 12 editions
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Six Capitals, or Can Accoun...

4.06 avg rating — 53 ratings — published 2014 — 6 editions
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Classics: 62 Great Books fr...

3.65 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 2007
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Australian Classics: 50 Gre...

3.94 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2007 — 6 editions
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Classics:  Books For Life

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2009 — 2 editions
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Soll und Haben: Die doppelt...

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Australian Classics

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2011
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I Met a Martian, and Other ...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2012
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Overland Issue 204

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4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2011
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“As Francesco Datini of Prato did a century before, Pacioli advises merchants to incorporate explicit signs of Christianity into their books as a way of legitimising their profit-seeking activities. The use of double entry itself was like the Catholic confession: if a merchant confessed—or accounted for—all his world activities before God, then perhaps his sins would be absolved. These Christian flourishes that Pacioli recommends merchants include in their books are therefore no mere ornaments.”
Jane Gleeson-White, Double Entry: How the Merchants of Venice Shaped the Modern World

“(Demanding interest on loans was not permitted anywhere in Europe until 1545, when Henry VIII legalised it in England.)”
Jane Gleeson-White, Double Entry: How the Merchants of Venice Created Modern Finance

“To honour his bills of exchange, Badoer had at least four accounts with local bankers in Constantinople, where banking was organised along the same lines as on the Rialto: a bank’s primary function was not to lend money, but to transfer the funds of its depositors, who personally presented themselves to authorise the transfer of money to creditor accounts in different cities.”
Jane Gleeson-White, Double Entry: How the Merchants of Venice Created Modern Finance

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