Wallace Thurman

Wallace Thurman


Born
in Salt Lake City, Utah , The United States
August 16, 1902

Died
December 26, 1934


Wallace Henry Thurman (1902–1934) was an American novelist active during the Harlem Renaissance. He also wrote essays, worked as an editor, and was a publisher of short-lived newspapers and literary journals. He is best known for his novel The Blacker the Berry: A Novel of Negro Life (1929), which explores discrimination within the black community based on skin color, with lighter skin being more highly valued.

(from Wikipedia)

Average rating: 3.93 · 1,950 ratings · 174 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Blacker the Berry...

3.95 avg rating — 1,551 ratings — published 1929 — 19 editions
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Infants of the Spring

3.69 avg rating — 281 ratings — published 1977 — 12 editions
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Fire!!

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4.41 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 1926 — 2 editions
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The Collected Writings of W...

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3.77 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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The Blacker the Berry: A No...

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Negro life in New York's Ha...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings3 editions
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Go the Way Your Blood Beats...

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4.07 avg rating — 45 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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Harlem Renaissance: Five No...

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4.29 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 2011
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More books by Wallace Thurman…
“I am reminded again that the greatest phrase ever written is words, words, words.”
Wallace Thurman

“I cannot bear to associate with the ordinary run of people. I have to surround myself with individuals who for the most part are more than a trifle insane”
Wallace Thurman, Infants of the Spring

“Beloved, we join hands here to pray for gin. An aridity defiles us. Our innards thirst for the juice of juniper. Something must be done. The drought threatens to destroy us. Surely, God who let manna fall from the heavens so that the holy children of Israel might eat, will not let the equally holy children of Niggeratti Manor die from the want of a little gin. Children, let us pray.”
Wallace Thurman, Infants of the Spring