Christopher Lloyd


Born
in Northiam, East Sussex, England, The United Kingdom
March 02, 1921

Died
January 27, 2006

Website

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Christopher Hamilton Lloyd, OBE, was a British gardener and author. He was the 20th Century chronicler for the heavily planted, labour-intensive, country garden.[

Average rating: 4.14 · 684 ratings · 60 reviews · 32 distinct works
The Well-Tempered Garden

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4.32 avg rating — 103 ratings — published 1978 — 11 editions
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The Cottage Garden

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4.20 avg rating — 96 ratings — published 1990 — 5 editions
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Succession Planting for Yea...

4.14 avg rating — 50 ratings — published 2005
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Color for Adventurous Garde...

4.08 avg rating — 53 ratings — published 2001 — 5 editions
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Exotic Planting for Adventu...

4.12 avg rating — 41 ratings — published 2007 — 2 editions
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Christopher Lloyd's Garden ...

4.12 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 2000 — 4 editions
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Christopher Lloyd's Gardeni...

4.06 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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In My Garden

4.27 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 1993 — 5 editions
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Cuttings: A Year in the Gar...

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4.15 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2007 — 2 editions
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Succession Planting for Adv...

4.71 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 2005
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More books by Christopher Lloyd…
“Many gardeners will agree that hand-weeding is not the terrible drudgery that it is often made out to be. Some people find in it a kind of soothing monotony. It leaves their minds free to develop the plot for their next novel or to perfect the brilliant repartee with which they should have encountered a relative's latest example of unreasonableness.”
Christopher Lloyd, The Well-Tempered Garden

“Placoderms”
Christopher Lloyd, What on Earth Happened?... In Brief: The Planet, Life & People from the Big Bang to the Present Day

“The Vikings... establishing themselves as the Rus, a word that is thought to come from an old Norse term, rods, meaning "men in row". Islamic sources say they then subjugated the Slavic peoples, who were traded as slaves along a network that reached across the Black Sea as far as Islamic Baghdad. ("Slav" possibly comes from their being traded as slaves by the Rus).”
Christopher Lloyd