Brett King

Ashlee
1,253 books | 460 friends

Jen
Jen
335 books | 153 friends

Jonatha...
333 books | 75 friends

Charibel
201 books | 42 friends

Paul Ke...
2 books | 482 friends

Penny
44 books | 1 friend


Brett King

Goodreads Author


Website

Twitter

Genre

Member Since
April 2010

URL


Average rating: 3.81 · 822 ratings · 62 reviews · 9 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Radix

3.64 avg rating — 512 ratings — published 2010 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Bank 4.0: Banking everywher...

4.18 avg rating — 175 ratings2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The False Door (John Brynst...

3.85 avg rating — 104 ratings — published 2011 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Bank 4.0: Banking Everywher...

4.42 avg rating — 19 ratings2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Bank 4.0: Embedded, Ubiquit...

4.10 avg rating — 10 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Bank 4.0: Banking Everywher...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Epoha dopolnennoy realnosti

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Bank 3.0 - Tương Lai Của Ng...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Breaking Digital Gridlock, ...

by
4.70 avg rating — 10 ratings5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Brett King…
The Radix The False Door
(2 books)
by
3.68 avg rating — 616 ratings

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

Brett’s Recent Updates

“That looked like an intense little conversation,” she said. “Who called?” “President of the United States,” he answered, starting the engine. “Okay, fine,” Cori sighed. “Don’t tell me.”
Brett King, The Radix

“The banking system we have today is a direct descendent of banking from the Middle Ages. The Medici family in Florence, Italy, arguably created the formal structure of the bank that we still retain today, after many developments. The paper currency we have today is an iteration on coins used before the first century. Today’s payments networks are iterations on the 12th century European network of the Knights Templar, who used to securely move money around for banks, royalty and wealthy aristocrats of the period. The debit cards we have today are iterations on the bank passbook that you might have owned if you had had a bank account in the year 1850. Apple Pay is itself an iteration on the debit card—effectively a tokenised version of the plastic artifact reproduced inside an iPhone. And bank branches? Well, they haven’t materially changed since the oldest bank in the world, Monte Dei Paschi de Sienna, opened their doors to the public 750 years ago.”
Brett King, Bank 4.0: Banking Everywhere, Never at a Bank




No comments have been added yet.