Charles D. Ellis


Born
Boston, The United States

Charles “Charley” D. Ellis (born 1937) is a leading American investment consultant. In 1972, Ellis founded Greenwich Associates, an international strategy consulting firm focused on financial institutions. Ellis is known for his philosophy of passive investing through index funds, as published in his book “Winning the Loser’s Game.”

Average rating: 3.98 · 4,844 ratings · 360 reviews · 52 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Partnership: The Making...

3.79 avg rating — 1,004 ratings — published 2008 — 16 editions
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Winning the Loser's Game: T...

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3.98 avg rating — 952 ratings — published 1998 — 24 editions
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Capital: The Story of Long-...

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3.97 avg rating — 121 ratings — published 2004 — 8 editions
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The Index Revolution: Why I...

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3.59 avg rating — 80 ratings4 editions
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Falling Short: The Coming R...

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3.65 avg rating — 68 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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What It Takes: Seven Secret...

3.52 avg rating — 69 ratings — published 2013 — 6 editions
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Classics: An Investor's Ant...

3.97 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 1988 — 2 editions
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The Investor's Anthology: O...

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3.97 avg rating — 29 ratings3 editions
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Joe Wilson and the Creation...

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3.70 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 2006 — 7 editions
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Investment Policy: How to W...

3.75 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1985 — 6 editions
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“After adjusting the comparison of index funds to actively managed funds for survivorship bias, taxes, and loads, the dominance of index funds reaches insurmountable proportions. Once”
Charles D. Ellis, Winning the Loser's Game: Timeless Strategies for Successful Investing

“An active manager must overcome the drag of about 3.25 percent in annual operating costs. If the fund manager is only to match the market’s historical 9 percent return, he or she must return 12.25 percent before all those costs. In other words, to do merely as well as the market, an active fund manager must be able to outperform the market return by over one-third or 34.1 percent!5”
Charles D. Ellis, Winning the Loser's Game: Timeless Strategies for Successful Investing

“Keeping skills up to date requires the investment of time, effort, and perhaps even money for tuition. But it’s worth it for an extra decade of productive activity.”
Charles D. Ellis, Falling Short: The Coming Retirement Crisis and What to Do About It



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