Charles F. Meyer



Average rating: 3.64 · 55 ratings · 5 reviews · 14 distinct worksSimilar authors
Introducing English Linguis...

3.38 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 2009 — 9 editions
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English Corpus Linguistics:...

3.71 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1998 — 6 editions
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Apposition in Contemporary ...

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1992 — 3 editions
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Corpus Analysis: Language S...

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A Linguistic Study Of Ameri...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1987
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A College Grammar of English

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3.90 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1989
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Romanticism, Revolution and...

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3.67 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2009 — 7 editions
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King Richard III

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3.93 avg rating — 42,739 ratings — published 1593 — 1008 editions
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The Verb in Contemporary En...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1995 — 2 editions
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Twentieth Century English: ...

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2006 — 7 editions
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“That the present tense marker in English can mark time frames other than the immediate present has led many grammarians, including Quirk et al. (1985), to argue that semantically English does not have a present tense per se but rather a past tense and a non-past tense.”
Charles F. Meyer, Introducing English Linguistics

“the Latin word for Modern English girl, which contains the base form puell-, is marked for the feminine gender and would, accordingly, receive specific endings depending on its case –nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative, and vocative –and its number (i.e. whether girl is singular or plural). Markings of this nature are what Comrie (1990: 337–8) terms as “fusional”; that is, there are not separate inflections for case and for number. Instead, case and number work together, producing a single combined inflection.”
Charles F. Meyer, Introducing English Linguistics

“If notional definitions are so problematic, it is worth asking why they persist. One reason is that they have a long tradition in English grammar, largely because grammars of English are based on the terminology found in classical Greek and Roman grammars. For instance, the notional definition of a sentence as a “complete thought” can be traced back to Dionysius Thrax’s Greek grammar written ca. 100 BC. Linguists of the modern era have modified this terminology as a result of advances in linguistic science and the need to have terminology that describes languages that are very different from Greek, Latin, English, and other Indo-European languages – the languages upon which traditional grammar is based.”
Charles F. Meyer, Introducing English Linguistics



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