Mel Bartholomew



Average rating: 4.12 · 7,654 ratings · 865 reviews · 17 distinct worksSimilar authors
All New Square Foot Gardening

4.12 avg rating — 7,225 ratings — published 1981 — 19 editions
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All New Square Foot Gardeni...

4.38 avg rating — 87 ratings2 editions
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Square Foot Gardening with ...

3.87 avg rating — 71 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
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Getting The Most from Your ...

4.20 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 2012
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Square Metre Gardening

3.73 avg rating — 48 ratings — published 2013 — 8 editions
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High-Value Veggies: A garde...

3.81 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 2016 — 3 editions
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Square Foot Gardening: Answ...

3.96 avg rating — 53 ratings — published 2012 — 4 editions
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Cash from Square Foot Garde...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 42 ratings — published 1985 — 4 editions
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Square Foot Gardening to th...

4.50 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2010
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Square Foot Gardening: Less...

4.57 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1999
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More books by Mel Bartholomew…
All New Square Foot Gardeni...
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4.38 avg rating — 87 ratings

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“Plants like beer! Don’t just dump beer left in bottles after a party. Once it becomes flat—after a day or two—add the beer to your SFG bucket of sun-warmed water. The nutrients and salts in the beer will give your plants an added boost. Of course, if the dog seems a little dopey for no apparent reason, you’ll know you need to put a cover on that bucket!”
Mel Bartholomew, Square Foot Gardening: Answer Book

“How do I save my squash plants from these disgusting squash bugs? Squash bugs can proliferate quickly and they are tough to eradicate, so it’s important to take action at the first sight of one. The larvae and young bugs are much easier to kill than the mature individuals. They are slow moving and easy to catch, so handpicking can be an effective control method. Drop mature bugs into a jar of warm soapy water, and knock or brush eggs from the undersides of leaves into the same jar. You can destroy these bugs and the eggs by just squishing them, but I wouldn’t recommend this. They are relatives of the stinkbug and you’ll find out just how closely related they are when you squish them. You’ll think they’re second cousins! Some gardeners have had success with Neem oil, but this usually isn’t effective against adult squash bugs. I would suggest hitting them early and often with physical removal, and making sure there is no yard debris about that could shelter the bugs. Other than that, healthy plants are your best defense against the damage these bugs can cause. Notice above the importance of catching a problem like this early, when there’s just eggs or small bugs. Much easier to control. Remember how I tell people that with a big single row garden way out back you only visit it a couple times a week and the bugs can get a good foothold before you even notice them. Then it’s almost too late. With your Square Foot Garden, you tend it regularly, and with hand watering, you nurture your plants; you’ll see the bugs right away. You’ll see the first sign of something wrong, and then it’s much easier to take care of. It’s just like nurturing your children. If you only see them twice a week, you don’t notice they have the sniffles. Then they come down with a cold, which turns into a serious illness. Then it’s too late to correct. Catch it when they still have a runny nose—and tend your gardens the same way. That’s why I like to encourage people to treat their plants like their children.”
Mel Bartholomew, Square Foot Gardening: Answer Book

“So, let’s review how to figure volume. Volume is merely: area × depth = cubic feet. In other words, square feet (the area) times the depth equals cubic feet. Our 4 × 4-foot box is 16 square feet in area (that’s 4 feet times 4 feet). If it were 1 foot deep, the volume would be: 16 (the area) times 1 (the depth) equals 16 cubic feet. But it’s not 1 foot deep, it’s only 6 inches deep so we need only one-half or just 8 cubic feet for our 4 × 4 box. The math looks like this: 4 times 4 divided by one-half foot equals 8. Or to show it mathematically, (4 × 4)/2 = 8. (Now don’t laugh, kids, some of the parents will be thankful for this kind of help).”
Mel Bartholomew, All New Square Foot Gardening: The Revolutionary Way to Grow More In Less Space

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