Laura Smith



There is more than one author with this name.

Average rating: 3.51 · 482 ratings · 77 reviews · 94 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Art of Vanishing: A Mem...

3.44 avg rating — 415 ratings — published 2018 — 3 editions
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Psychology, Poverty, and th...

4.20 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
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Meditation: 25 Techniques o...

4.20 avg rating — 5 ratings
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Dark Road

4.75 avg rating — 4 ratings
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Shifter's Play

4.67 avg rating — 3 ratings
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I Am What I Am... CRPS Style!

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2013
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Cognitive Behavioral Therap...

2.67 avg rating — 3 ratings
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Toni Morrison's The Bluest ...

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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Happiness: How to Smile Mor...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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Virginia Woolf: An Exhibiti...

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More books by Laura Smith…

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“I began writing about a woman who disappears. Not Barbara, but a fictional woman. She was a botanist who had vanished, perhaps deliberately, in the Burmese jungle in search of a rare, psychedelic mushroom. I wrote about her because, of course, I wanted to disappear. Often those who write about women who have vanished are men with an impulse to eviscerate women, or women with an impulse to eviscerate themselves. I was interested in a different kind of vanishing: the kind where you disentangle yourself from your life and start fresh. People would miss you. You could miss them. You could live at a peaceful distance, loving them in a way that is simpler than the way you love someone you have to deal with in everyday life. You hadn't abandoned them. You were just gone. Mysterious rather than rejecting. Vanishing was a way to reclaim your life.”
Laura Smith, The Art of Vanishing: A Memoir of Wanderlust

“As she was putting the finishing touches on The House Without Windows, she wrote of her yearning for a wilder life: “I want as long as possible in that green, fairylike, woodsy, animal-filled, watery, luxuriant, butterfly-painted, moth-dotted, dragonfly-blotched, bird-filled, salamandrous, mossy, ferny, sunshiny, moonshiny, long-dayful, short-nightful land, on that fishy, froggy, tadpoly, shelly, lizard-filled lake—[oh,] no end of the lovely things to say about that place, and I am mad to get there.” Barbara is the girl inside the house, rattling at her cage, demanding to be set free. Go outside, she is saying. Embrace the world in all its frightening, joyful, sun-filled complexity.”
Laura Smith, The Art of Vanishing: A Memoir of Wanderlust

“I had believed that it was just a matter of looking, of trying hard enough. But suddenly, finding a single person among the billions of people who have lived and are living on this planet seemed absurd. Perhaps it was naive to believe that people leave marks on the world, that we are not churned back int the earth like dead leaves in a compost pile. I had heard once that in a hundred millions years, all buildings will be gone. Paper will exist, but the ink will vanish, so everything will be blank. Eternal blankness - forever. Why resist if that is our fate? I didn't even know my own great-grandparents' names. They had lived entire complex lives, had careers, had created homes and raised children. They had wanted things. Their children had known about them, their grandchildren less so but still some, and I knew nothing.”
Laura Smith, The Art of Vanishing: A Memoir of Wanderlust



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