Helen Bevington


Born
in Afton, New York, The United States
April 02, 1906

Died
March 16, 2001

Genre


Helen Smith Bevington (1906–2001) was an American poet, prose author, and educator.

Bevington was born in Afton, New York. Bevington was reared in Worcester, New York where her father was a Methodist minister. Bevington attended the University of Chicago and earned a degree in philosophy. She proceeded to write a thesis about Thoreau, earning a master’s degree in English from Columbia University.In 1928, she married Merle M. Bevington (1900–64). The couple travelled abroad, returning in 1929 in response to the Stock Market Crash of 1929. Both Bevingtons taught English at Duke University starting in the 1940s, Helen retiring in 1976.

In addition to her 12 books of poetry and essays, Bevington's work appeared in The New York Times Book Review,
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Average rating: 3.93 · 14 ratings · 5 reviews · 9 distinct works
Along Came the Witch: A Jou...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1976
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A Book and a Love Affair

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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Charley Smith's Girl: A Memoir

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1965
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The Journey is Everything: ...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1983 — 3 editions
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The Third and Only Way: Ref...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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When Found, Make a Verse of

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1961
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A Change of Sky, and Other ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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The World and the Bo Tree

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1991 — 2 editions
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The House Was Quiet and the...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1971
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More books by Helen Bevington…
“The seasonal urge is strong in poets. Milton wrote chiefly in winter. Keats looked for spring to wake him up (as it did in the miraculous months of April and May, 1819). Burns chose autumn. Longfellow liked the month of September. Shelley flourished in the hot months. Some poets, like Wordsworth, have gone outdoors to work. Others, like Auden, keep to the curtained room. Schiller needed the smell of rotten apples about him to make a poem. Tennyson and Walter de la Mare had to smoke. Auden drinks lots of tea, Spender coffee; Hart Crane drank alcohol. Pope, Byron, and William Morris were creative late at night. And so it goes.”
Helen Bevington, When Found, Make a Verse of

“It seems an odd idea to my students that poetry, like all art, leads us away from itself, back to the world in which we live. It furnishes the vision. It shows with intense clarity what is already there.”
Helen Bevington, When Found, Make a Verse of

Topics Mentioning This Author

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500 Great Books B...: This topic has been closed to new comments. Nonfiction Varieties 4 125 Sep 20, 2014 08:07PM  
500 Great Books B...: This topic has been closed to new comments. Decades, Centuries, and Millenia 8 280 Dec 06, 2014 09:46PM  
500 Great Books B...: This topic has been closed to new comments. Underread 500 GBBW 3 129 Dec 10, 2014 01:00PM