Jennifer Harvey



Average rating: 4.16 · 1,588 ratings · 243 reviews · 11 distinct worksSimilar authors
Raising White Kids: Bringin...

4.18 avg rating — 1,360 ratings — published 2018 — 6 editions
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Dear White Christians: For ...

4.11 avg rating — 169 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
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Disrupting White Supremacy

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4.12 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
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Whiteness and Morality: Pur...

4.25 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2007 — 5 editions
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Bristol short story prize a...

3.17 avg rating — 6 ratings
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Reporting Techniques for Bu...

did not like it 1.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Making the Diagnosis: A Pra...

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did not like it 1.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Once Upon a Time in Washington

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Making Games for the NES

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4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings2 editions
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Ripening: 2018 National Fla...

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4.30 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2018 — 2 editions
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“Children can’t learn antiracism if they don’t have the practice of observing, naming, and discussing race in their tool kit.”
Jennifer Harvey, Raising White Kids: Bringing Up Children in a Racially Unjust America

“I am committed to justice because first I believed that truly God so loved this broken, aching world.”
Jennifer Harvey, Dear White Christians: For Those Still Longing for Racial Reconciliation (Prophetic Christianity Series

“is difficult for many white adults to begin to speak about race openly and explicitly. We only learn to do it and get better at it through practice. There’s no way around those awkward, challenging feelings. ​There’s no special age at which point kids are ready to hear and understand the difficult truths about race and racism. They begin to work out their racial concepts and ideas long before they can articulate them. ​We start with our children’s deepest assumptions about the world: a notion of race as visible and normal, an awareness of racial injustice, and a working presumption that people can and do take actions against racism. ​ Young children should be engaged with lots of talk about difference: skin tone and bodies, and the ways different communities of color identify. Making a commitment to normalize talk about difference preempts the pressures kids experience to treat difference as a taboo. ​Be aware that using the language of race—especially with young children—always runs the risk of reducing people to labels or implying everyone who shares that identity label is the same in some significant way (stereotyping). Be specific and nuanced. ​Race-conscious parenting for a healthy white identity development must include teaching about racial injustice and inequity as much as it does racial difference. Consider experiential learning, such as protests, for this.”
Jennifer Harvey, Raising White Kids: Bringing Up Children in a Racially Unjust America



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