Sarah Deer

Sarah Deer


Born
November 09, 1972


Sarah Deer (born November 9, 1972) is an American lawyer, professor of law at William Mitchell College, and 2014 MacArthur fellow.She advocates for survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence in Native American communities. She has been credited for her "instrumental role" in the 2013 reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, as well as for testimony which is credited with the 2010 passage of the Tribal Law and Order Act. Deer coauthored, with Bonnie Claremont, Amnesty International's 2007 report Maze of Injustice, documenting sexual assault against Native American women.

Deer received her B.A. and J.D. from the University of Kansas.

She is a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

(from Wikipedia)

Average rating: 4.28 · 116 ratings · 14 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Beginning and End of Ra...

4.52 avg rating — 82 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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Sharing Our Stories of Surv...

4.21 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2007 — 5 editions
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Tribal Criminal Law and Pro...

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it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2004 — 7 editions
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The Process of Legal Resear...

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2012 — 4 editions
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Introduction to Tribal Lega...

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4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2004 — 11 editions
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The Prostitution and Traffi...

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Structuring Sovereignty: Co...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014
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Tribal Criminal Law and Pro...

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“Rape is more of a fundamental threat to self-determination of tribal nations than the drawbacks federal reform could ever be. Rape and child sexual abuse are directly related to most of the social challenges tribal nations face, and when people are hurting, they cannot effectively govern themselves or provide guidance and support for the children in the community.”
Sarah Deer, The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America

“Ignoring sexual violence may sidestep painful realities, but silence is also one of the most insidious weapons invoked by rapists. Survivors experience tremendous shame and guilt, which is compounded by the secrets they must keep to survive. Where”
Sarah Deer, The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America

“In this antiquated framework, prosecutors (and victims) had to demonstrate extreme physical force, which usually required proof of extreme physical resistance. For example, the 1980 Texas rape law required that the victim “resist to the utmost” or with “such earnest resistance as might reasonably be expected under the circumstances.” It was common for juries to acquit alleged rapists because the victim was not sufficiently injured, determining that she could not truly have been forced if she did not fight back. Physical force is, of course, uncommon in cases of sexual assault. Perpetrators generally use other kinds of nonphysical force, such as coercion and threats.”
Sarah Deer, The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America



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