Maggie Lamond Simone

more photos (1)

Amy Moon
1,014 books | 47 friends

Kate La...
153 books | 48 friends

Kim Reed
927 books | 126 friends

Chris T...
79 books | 247 friends

Hattie ...
77 books | 34 friends

Shawn
169 books | 25 friends

F.
F.
83 books | 321 friends

Bridget
67 books | 1 friend


Maggie Lamond Simone

Goodreads Author


Website

Twitter

Genre

Member Since
September 2010


MAGGIE LAMOND SIMONE is a national award-winning columnist and author. Her memoir, “Body Punishment: OCD, Addiction and Finding the Courage to Heal,” was released in April 2015 (Central Recovery Press), earning her a spot at the 2015 BEA in New York City. Her essay collection, “From Beer to Maternity,” was a 2010 USA Book News Finalist for humor, and her columns can also be found in “The Zen of Midlife Mothering” (2013), “Not Your Mother’s Book on Do-It-Yourselfers” (2013), “P.S. What I Didn’t Say” (2009), “Chicken Soup for the Soul: My Resolution” (2008), “Chicken Soup for the New Mom’s Soul” (2007), “Chicken Soup for the Soul in Menopause” (2007), “Misadventures of Moms and Disasters of Dads” (2004), “Hello, Goodbye” (2004), Cosmopolitan ...more

Popular Answered Questions

Maggie Lamond Simone One word: pajamas. And naps. So two words.
Maggie Lamond Simone That's a good one - if I knew, I could market it and quit my day job! Inspiration typically comes to me in the form of a simple thought - one concept …moreThat's a good one - if I knew, I could market it and quit my day job! Inspiration typically comes to me in the form of a simple thought - one concept from which I know I can create an essay. I think of my beginning, I think of my ending, and the rest just comes. Once the beginning and ending are done, as far as I'm concerned, it's done. (less)
Average rating: 3.87 · 45 ratings · 16 reviews · 4 distinct worksSimilar authors
From Beer to Maternity

3.73 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 2009 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Body Punishment: OCD, Addic...

4.07 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Posted: Parenting, Pets and...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Sophie's Sounds

by
0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2007
Rate this book
Clear rating

* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

Maggie’s Recent Updates

Maggie Simone answered Diane's question: Maggie Lamond Simone
Hi Diane! Some of the envelopes did not stay closed and some people actually got empty envelopes! Can you send me your address and I'll put another one in the mail? Thank you - and sorry!

Maggie S.
Maggie Simone shared a quote
1041381
“On the way home from the store the girl said she's afraid to fly over the ocean for our impending Europe trip. I said, "Honey, your chances are much better of getting killed in a car crash than a plane crash." She looked around the car and started crying, and the boy said, "Really, mom? That was the best you could do?" Consoling mommy: fail.”
Maggie Lamond Simone
Maggie Simone shared a quote
Posted by Maggie Lamond Simone
“Just for kicks, I measured out 2/3 cup of Special K cereal, which is the suggested serving size, and am speechless. Do they think I'm an idiot? Of COURSE I'd lose weight if I only ate that much! It's like a teaspoonful! It's probably a third of what I usually - oh, wait. I get it. Never mind.”
Maggie Lamond Simone
Maggie Lamond Simone is accepting questions on their profile page.
More of Maggie's books…
“One such cut on my skinny six-year-old leg began healing with a scab that was hard and crusty over the broken skin. As I ran my fingers over it one night, I suddenly felt the need to pick it off, and I did. The pain was momentarily excruciating, then settled into a dull stabbing where it was bleeding again. The part of me that was mortified at what I had done was soon stomped into submission by another part of me – a part that longed to reproduce that momentary excruciating pain again and again. I was slightly disturbed by this turn of events, and way too embarrassed to tell my mother. So I didn’t, for about 40 years.

It was the first of many such secrets I learned to keep.”
Maggie Lamond Simone, Body Punishment: OCD, Addiction, and Finding the Courage to Heal

“Not unlike alcoholism, the cycle of OCD continues in solitude and isolation … Even in therapy it never occurred to me to talk about plucking out my eyelashes and eyebrows. Not once did I bring it up – not once did it occur to me bring it up, the shame was so deep and ingrained. Fortunately, over the years alcoholism has gotten more and more screen time and does not carry quite the cloak of shame it once did. You won’t necessarily find us shouting it from the rooftops, but then again there are support groups in high schools these days. Hopefully OCD will one day find a similar degree of understanding in the general audience, because that understanding and dialogue are what we need to break not necessarily the cycle of repetitive behavior - because sometimes we can and sometimes we can’t - but to break the cycle of shame. Because I can tell you from experience . . . the shame is a killer.”
Maggie Lamond Simone, Body Punishment: OCD, Addiction, and Finding the Courage to Heal

“In the 15 years since its inception, the column has documented my days of being single and alone for the first time, reentering the dating world as a sober person, dating, getting engaged, getting married, getting pregnant, having kids, and finding my life again after all of that. Sometimes it’s funny, sometimes not. Sometimes the not-so-funny things are important too.
What it is, though, is honest. My column has allowed me to show people – at whatever stage they’re at in life – that they don’t have to be perfect to be OK. There are no books on “What to Expect When Your Boyfriend Leaves You For His High School Crush,” or “What to Expect When Your Child Takes a Year to Potty Train.” But that doesn’t mean people don’t need to know that this stuff happens.
And more importantly, that they can survive when it does. Sometimes even laughing.”
Maggie Lamond Simone, From Beer to Maternity

“Drawing on my fine command of the English language, I said nothing.”
Robert Benchley
tags: humor

“One such cut on my skinny six-year-old leg began healing with a scab that was hard and crusty over the broken skin. As I ran my fingers over it one night, I suddenly felt the need to pick it off, and I did. The pain was momentarily excruciating, then settled into a dull stabbing where it was bleeding again. The part of me that was mortified at what I had done was soon stomped into submission by another part of me – a part that longed to reproduce that momentary excruciating pain again and again. I was slightly disturbed by this turn of events, and way too embarrassed to tell my mother. So I didn’t, for about 40 years.

It was the first of many such secrets I learned to keep.”
Maggie Lamond Simone, Body Punishment: OCD, Addiction, and Finding the Courage to Heal

“Not unlike alcoholism, the cycle of OCD continues in solitude and isolation … Even in therapy it never occurred to me to talk about plucking out my eyelashes and eyebrows. Not once did I bring it up – not once did it occur to me bring it up, the shame was so deep and ingrained. Fortunately, over the years alcoholism has gotten more and more screen time and does not carry quite the cloak of shame it once did. You won’t necessarily find us shouting it from the rooftops, but then again there are support groups in high schools these days. Hopefully OCD will one day find a similar degree of understanding in the general audience, because that understanding and dialogue are what we need to break not necessarily the cycle of repetitive behavior - because sometimes we can and sometimes we can’t - but to break the cycle of shame. Because I can tell you from experience . . . the shame is a killer.”
Maggie Lamond Simone, Body Punishment: OCD, Addiction, and Finding the Courage to Heal

“In the 15 years since its inception, the column has documented my days of being single and alone for the first time, reentering the dating world as a sober person, dating, getting engaged, getting married, getting pregnant, having kids, and finding my life again after all of that. Sometimes it’s funny, sometimes not. Sometimes the not-so-funny things are important too.
What it is, though, is honest. My column has allowed me to show people – at whatever stage they’re at in life – that they don’t have to be perfect to be OK. There are no books on “What to Expect When Your Boyfriend Leaves You For His High School Crush,” or “What to Expect When Your Child Takes a Year to Potty Train.” But that doesn’t mean people don’t need to know that this stuff happens.
And more importantly, that they can survive when it does. Sometimes even laughing.”
Maggie Lamond Simone, From Beer to Maternity

“I was going through The Box the other day, the one that's moved with me since college containing all of my important stuff, and I found some old letters and cards from relationships gone by. As I read them I got all misty and nostalgic, and suddenly I realized something for the first time in the month I've been married.
I can no longer date.
I shared this revelation with my husband, asking, "Did you know this? That you can't date anyone else? Ever? For the rest of your life?" He laughed and replied, "Well, yes, I did." He paused. "You didn't?"
"Of course I did . . . theoretically," I said, " but I guess the reality didn't hit me until now. I mean, our vows didn't specifically say 'No More Dating Other People.'"
He kind of glared at me this time. "It's implied."
OK, fine. I don't want to date anyone else anyway. It's just hard sometimes to let go of the past, and the older I get, the more past I have to let go of. But since I've always found it helpful to bare my soul to complete strangers, I will take this opportunity to give my deceased dating life a decent burial.”
Maggie Lamond Simone, From Beer to Maternity




No comments have been added yet.