Annabel Crabb



Annabel Crabb has been a journalist since 1997, beginning her career at Adelaide’s Advertiser and moving on to cover politics first for the Age and then for the Sydney Morning Herald, where she was a columnist and sketch-writer. She is the author of Losing It: The Inside Story of the Labor Party in Opposition (2005) and the Quarterly Essay Stop at Nothing: The Life and Adventures of Malcolm Turnbull, which won a 2009 Walkley Award. She is presently the ABC’s chief online political writer.

Average rating: 4.09 · 2,921 ratings · 287 reviews · 10 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Wife Drought

4.14 avg rating — 2,257 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Stop At Nothing: The Life a...

4.01 avg rating — 233 ratings — published 2009 — 3 editions
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Stop at Nothing: The Life a...

3.85 avg rating — 227 ratings5 editions
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Special Delivery: Favourite...

4.22 avg rating — 69 ratings4 editions
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Rise of the Ruddbot: Observ...

3.65 avg rating — 57 ratings — published 2010 — 4 editions
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Losing It:  The Inside Stor...

3.34 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 2005 — 4 editions
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Special Guest: Recipes for ...

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4.46 avg rating — 13 ratings2 editions
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Politics, Work and Gender (...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — expected publication 2019 — 2 editions
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Annabel Crabb Untitled

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She's Having a Laugh: 25 of...

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3.44 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2015
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“How can you test whether something's an assumption? Try this: switch things around, and check how bananas everybody goes.”
Annabel Crabb, The Wife Drought

“smouldering away in a fit of impotent rage”
Annabel Crabb, The Wife Drought

“Have a look at the results when Australians are asked if they agree or disagree with the statement: ‘It is better for the family if the husband is the principal breadwinner outside the home and the wife has primary responsibility for the home and children.’ In 1986, just over 55 per cent of men agreed with that proposition. That proportion swan-dived down to about 30 per cent by 2001, but by 2005, it had gone up again, to 41.4 per cent. Women subscribe to that view less enthusiastically than men on the whole, but they too have waxed and waned over the last 30 years. In 1986, 33 per cent of them thought it was better for men to work and women to keep house. By 2001, that had dipped to 19 per cent. But by 2005, it had bobbed back up to 36.4 per cent.17”
Annabel Crabb, The Wife Drought



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