Barbara Pleasant



Average rating: 4.05 · 1,155 ratings · 160 reviews · 38 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Complete Compost Garden...

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4.13 avg rating — 451 ratings — published 2008 — 5 editions
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Starter Vegetable Gardens: ...

3.94 avg rating — 268 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
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The Complete Houseplant Sur...

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4.19 avg rating — 155 ratings — published 2005 — 3 editions
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Homegrown Pantry: A Gardene...

4.28 avg rating — 57 ratings2 editions
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Gardening Essentials

3.61 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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Easy Garden Projects to Mak...

4.06 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 2006 — 3 editions
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Ortho's All about Vegetables

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3.93 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1999
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Plant to Preserve: Plan the...

4.25 avg rating — 12 ratings
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Garden Stone: Creative Land...

4.18 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2004
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The Gardener's Weed Book: E...

3.29 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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“Are they “plants whose virtues have yet to be discovered” (Walt Whitman), “guardians of the soil”(Joseph Cocannouer), or something equally nice, or are they sly thieves that steal the soil’s resources and gardeners’ precious time? Perhaps they can only really be defined from a practical point of view: Weeds are any plants that insist on growing where you don’t want them to grow.”
Barbara Pleasant, Controlling Garden Weeds: Storey's Country Wisdom Bulletin A-171

“They do a terrible job of adapting to natural ecosystems (like a mature forest or grassy prairie). If you were to abandon your garden tomorrow and let nature have its way with the place, most plants that fit into the category of garden weeds would be gone within a few years. Garden weeds depend on humans to provide them with an open place to grow, and they further benefit from our efforts to keep garden soil fertile and moist. Where humans cultivate, garden weeds grow.”
Barbara Pleasant, Controlling Garden Weeds: Storey's Country Wisdom Bulletin A-171

“All gardeners can assume that every square inch of their garden soil contains weeds. Some of them may have been there for years, while others dropped or blew in only yesterday. The seeds that exist naturally in any soil are called the soil’s seed bank.”
Barbara Pleasant, Controlling Garden Weeds: Storey's Country Wisdom Bulletin A-171



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