Jonathan Morduch


Born
in The United States
October 03, 1963

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Jonathan Morduch (born October 3, 1963) is a professor of public policy and economics at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. He is a development economist most well known for his significant academic contributions to assessing the impact of microfinance since the early years of the movement. He has written extensively on poverty and financial institutions in developing countries and on tensions between achieving social impacts and meeting financial goals in microfinance.

Morduch is the managing director of the Financial Access Initiative, a consortium of leading development economists (including Sendhil Mullainathan at Harvard and Dean Karlan at Yale) that aims to expand access to financial services for low-income
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Average rating: 3.92 · 1,380 ratings · 137 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Financial Diaries: How ...

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3.91 avg rating — 286 ratings4 editions
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The Economics of Microfinance

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3.86 avg rating — 127 ratings — published 2005 — 9 editions
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Smartbook Access Card for M...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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Microeconomics

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3.67 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2013 — 14 editions
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Macroeconomics

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3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2013 — 7 editions
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Portfolios of the Poor: How...

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3.94 avg rating — 964 ratings — published 2009 — 11 editions
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Banking the World

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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Economics

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013 — 12 editions
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Connect 1-Semester Access C...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
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ECONOMICS

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“A 2014 New York Times profile of a Starbucks barista so clearly demonstrated the serious negative consequences of her frequently changing work schedule (especially on her ability to find quality child care), and how common irregular and volatile schedules were for Starbucks workers, that the company announced changes to its scheduling policies within forty-eight hours.46”
Jonathan Morduch, The Financial Diaries: How American Families Cope in a World of Uncertainty

“Income volatility can also interfere with the existing social safety net. Some welfare programs require beneficiaries to work a certain number of hours each week, assuming that the number of hours worked is under the control of the employee, rather than the employer.53 Qualification for programs like food stamps and health insurance subsidies is based on an average monthly income threshold. But of course volatile incomes mean that families bounce in and out of eligibility.54 Bouncing in and out of Medicaid ineligibility causes interruptions in care for chronic conditions, particularly in places where the doctors who accept Medicaid and private insurance don’t overlap.55 There can also be severe penalties for “fraud” in these programs, receiving benefits when your income is too high. But households subject to volatile incomes may not, themselves, know when or whether they will cross thresholds of eligibility. For instance, as of 2016, the Pennsylvania Medicaid Application asks whether anyone in the household has a hard time predicting their income, but in the very next question requires applicants to do exactly that—for the next twenty-four months—in order to establish eligibility.”
Jonathan Morduch, The Financial Diaries: How American Families Cope in a World of Uncertainty

“Between 2003 and 2013, health insurance premiums for employer-provided health benefits rose by 73 percent—and workers’ share of that increase was 93 percent. Deductibles more than doubled.”
Jonathan Morduch, The Financial Diaries: How American Families Cope in a World of Uncertainty



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