Gerald O'Collins

Gerald O'Collins


Born
Australia

Born in Australia, Gerald O’Collins received his PhD at Cambridge University in 1968. From 1973 to 2006 he taught at the Gregorian University (Rome), where he was also dean of the theology faculty (1985–91). He is now a research professor in theology at St Mary’s University College in Twickenham.

Average rating: 3.81 · 450 ratings · 62 reviews · 64 distinct worksSimilar authors
Catholicism: A Very Short I...

3.09 avg rating — 87 ratings — published 2008 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Christology: A Biblical, Hi...

4.06 avg rating — 77 ratings — published 1995 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Tripersonal God: Unders...

3.81 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 1999 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Catholicism: The Story of C...

by
4.09 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2003 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Concise Dictionary of Theology

4.12 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1991 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Second Journey

3.93 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 1978 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Jesus: A Portrait

4.44 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Rethinking Fundamental Theo...

3.79 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1993 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Living Vatican II: The 21st...

4.13 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2006
Rate this book
Clear rating
Jesus Our Redeemer: A Chris...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2007 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Gerald O'Collins…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Our planet cannot continue to be a life-giving environment unless human beings quickly become much more responsible stewards of the created world.”
Gerald O'Collins, Catholicism: A Very Short Introduction

“limited to the seven sacraments of baptism, confirmation, Eucharist, penance, the anointing of the sick, holy orders, and matrimony. But they are seven central means for the common worship of God, privileged means that bring Catholics together in a community of mutual support and enable them to experience the risen Christ as effectively present in their lives. The sacraments are vivid, perceptible signs (that can be seen, heard, tasted, touched, and smelled); they create ritual dramas that take believers into a sacred time and place. They help participants to absorb the truths and values of Christian faith or allow such truths and values to revivify. They are a school of faith, a matrix for maturing faith. The sacraments confer and strengthen the new life of grace in the particular form that each sacrament symbolizes.”
Gerald O'Collins, Catholicism: A Very Short Introduction



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Gerald to Goodreads.