Philip F. Lawler



Average rating: 4.36 · 145 ratings · 13 reviews · 12 distinct works
The Smoke of Satan: How Cor...

4.58 avg rating — 59 ratings
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The Faithful Departed: The ...

4.27 avg rating — 64 ratings — published 2008 — 7 editions
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A Call to Serve: Pope Franc...

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3.91 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2013
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Coughing in Ink

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1983 — 2 editions
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Operation Rescue: A Challen...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1992
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When Faith Goes Viral: 11 S...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013
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The Alternative Influence: ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1985 — 2 editions
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Sweet Talk: Media Coverage ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1986
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The ultimate weapon

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1984
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Shaken by Scandals: Catholi...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2002
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“Pope Pius X wrote that the Modernists were “the most pernicious of all the adversaries of the Church” because of “their designs for her undoing, not from without but from within.”36”
Philip F. Lawler, The Smoke of Satan: How Corrupt and Cowardly Bishops Betrayed Christ, His Church, and the Faithful . . . and What Can Be Done About It

“Vatican I warned the faithful that Modernism is incompatible with Catholic doctrine. According to Cardinal Maradiaga, Vatican II taught that Modernism is compatible with Catholic doctrine, and indeed might be a more authentic form of Catholicism.”
Philip F. Lawler, The Smoke of Satan: How Corrupt and Cowardly Bishops Betrayed Christ, His Church, and the Faithful . . . and What Can Be Done About It

“Who is going to save our Church?” asked Archbishop Sheen. “Do not look to the priests. Do not look to the bishops. It’s up to you, the laity, to remind our priests to be priests and our bishops to be bishops.” If the dismal summer of 2018 is to produce any good result, it will be by underlining that message. The loyal Catholic laity, stirred by anger into action, will demand an end to the corruption of the Church and a full return to her evangelical purpose. At the turn of the seventh century, Pope Gregory the Great spoke in a homily about a failing of bishops that “discourages me greatly.” Accusing himself of the same weakness that he saw among his brother bishops, he said, “We abandon the ministry of preaching and, in my opinion, are called bishops to our detriment, for we retain the honorable office but fail to practice the virtues proper to it. Those who have been entrusted to us abandon God, and we are silent. They fall into sin, and we do not extend a hand of rebuke. … We are wrapped up in worldly concerns, and the more we devote ourselves to external things, the more insensitive we become in spirit.” The mistaken belief that bishops always have the power to speak on behalf of “the Church” plays into the popular misconception that bishops could, if they wished, change unpopular Catholic doctrines. The perception of the Church as a multinational corporation, with bishops (and ultimately the pope) wielding executive control, encourages secular critics to argue that the hierarchy should tailor dogmas to match popular styles. Even the notion that doctrines should be established by public opinion reflects the clericalist mentality. It derives from the assumption that the Church is our possession, operating under our guidance. The truth, which bears constant repetition”
Philip F. Lawler, The Smoke of Satan: How Corrupt and Cowardly Bishops Betrayed Christ, His Church, and the Faithful . . . and What Can Be Done About It



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