Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following Pema Chödrön.

Pema Chödrön Pema Chödrön > Quotes


Pema Chödrön quotes (showing 31-60 of 731)

“Like all explorers, we are drawn to discover what's out there without knowing yet if we have the courage to face it.”
Pema Chödrön
“Letting there be room for not knowing is the most important thing of all. When there's a big disappointment, we don't know if that's the end of the story. It may just be the beginning of a great adventure. Life is like that. We don't know anything. We call something bad; we call it good. But really we just don't know.”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times
“The difference between theism and nontheism is not whether one does or does not believe in God. . . Theism is a deep-seated conviction that there's some hand to hold: if we just do the right things, someone will appreciate us and take care of us. . . Nontheism is relaxing with the ambiguity and uncertainty of the present moment without reaching for anything to protect ourselves.”
Pema Chödrön
“We can spend our whole lives escaping from the monsters of our minds. (36)”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heartfelt Advice for Hard Times
“So even if the hot loneliness is there, and for 1.6 seconds we sit with that restlessness when yesterday we couldn't sit for even one, that's the journey of the warrior. (68)”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heartfelt Advice for Hard Times
“Hope and fear come from feeling that we lack something; they come from a sense of poverty. We can’t simply relax with ourselves. We hold on to hope, and hope robs us of the present moment. We feel that someone else knows what is going on, but that there is something missing in us, and therefore something is lacking in our world.”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times
“When we protect ourselves so we won't feel pain, that protection becomes like armor, like armor that imprisons the softness of of the heart.”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times
“We are like children building a sand castle. We embellish it with beautiful shells, bits of driftwood, and pieces of colored glass. The castle is ours, off limits to others. We’re willing to attack if others threaten to hurt it. Yet despite all our attachment, we know that the tide will inevitably come in and sweep the sand castle away. The trick is to enjoy it fully but without clinging, and when the time comes, let it dissolve back into the sea.”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times
“No one ever tells us to stop running away from fear...the advice we usually get is to sweeten it up, smooth it over, take a pill, or distract ourselves, but by all means make it go away. (5)”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heartfelt Advice for Hard Times
“Things falling apart is a kind of testing and also a kind of healing. We think that the point is to pass the test or to overcome the problem, but the truth is that things don’t really get solved. They come together and they fall apart. Then they come together again and fall apart again. It’s just like that. The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen: room for grief, for relief, for misery, for joy.”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times
“We are all capable of becoming fundamentalists because we get addicted to other people's wrongness.”
Pema Chödrön
“Rejoicing in ordinary things is not sentimental or trite. It actually takes guts. Each time we drop our complaints and allow everyday good fortune to inspire us, we enter the warrior's world.”
Pema Chödrön, The Places That Scare You: A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times
“As long as our orientation is toward perfection or success, we will never
learn about unconditional friendship with ourselves, nor will we find
compassion. ”
Pema Chödrön
“We have two alternatives: either we question our beliefs - or we don't. Either we accept our fixed versions of reality- or we begin to challenge them. In Buddha's opinion, to train in staying open and curious - to train in dissolving our assumptions and beliefs - is the best use of our human lives.”
Pema Chödrön, The Pocket Pema Chodron
“Without giving up hope—that there’s somewhere better to be, that there’s someone better to be—we will never relax with where we are or who we are.”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times
“Nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know.”
Pema Chödrön, Comfortable with Uncertainty: 108 Teachings on Cultivating Fearlessness and Compassion
“When you begin to touch your heart or let your heart be touched, you begin to discover that it's bottomless, that it doesn't have any resolution, that this heart is huge, vast, and limitless. You begin to discover how much warmth and gentleness is there, as well as how much space.”
Pema Chödrön, Start Where You Are: A Guide to Compassionate Living
“There is a common misunderstanding among the human beings who have ever been born on earth that the best way to live is to try to avoid pain and just try to get comfortable. You see this even in insects and animals and birds. All of us are the some. A much more interesting, kind and joyful approach to life is to begin to develop our curiosity, not caring whether the object of our curiosity is bitter or sweet. To lead to a life that goes beyond pettiness and prejudice and always wanting to make sure that everything turns out on our own terms, to lead a more passionate, full, and delightful life than that, we must realize that we can endure a lot of pain and pleasure for the sake of finding out who we are and what this world is, how we tick and how our world ticks, how the whole thing just is. If we are committed to comfort at any cost, as soon as we come up against the least edge of pain, we’re going to run; we’ll never know what’s beyond that particular barrier or wall or fearful thing.”
Pema Chödrön
“What happens with you when you begin to feel uneasy, unsettled, queasy? Notice the panic, notice when you instantly grab for something. (51)”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heartfelt Advice for Hard Times
“True compassion does not come from wanting to help out those less fortunate than ourselves but from realizing our kinship with all beings.”
Pema Chödrön, Start Where You Are: A Guide to Compassionate Living
“When we resist change, it’s called suffering. But when we can completely let go and not struggle against it, when we can embrace the groundlessness of our situation and relax into it’s dynamic quality, that’s called enlightenment”
Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully: with Uncertainty and Change
“We think that if we just meditated enough or jogged enough or ate perfect food, everything would be perfect. But from the point of view of someone who is awake, that’s death. Seeking security or perfection, rejoicing in feeling confirmed and whole, self contained and comfortable, is some kind of death. It doesn’t have any fresh air. There’s no room for something to come in and interrupt all that. We are killing the moment by controlling our experience.”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times
“Abandon hope.”
Pema Chödrön
“The first noble truth of the Buddha is that when we feel suffering, it doesn’t mean that something is wrong. What a relief. Finally somebody told the truth. Suffering is part of life, and we don’t have to feel it’s happening because we personally made the wrong move. In reality, however, when we feel suffering, we think that something is wrong. As long as we’re addicted to hope, we feel that we can tone our experience down or liven it up or change it somehow, and we continue to suffer a lot.”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times
In meditation we discover our inherent restlessness. Sometimes we get up and leave. Sometimes we sit there but our bodies wiggle and squirm and our minds go far away. This can be so uncomfortable that we feel’s it’s impossible to stay. Yet this feeling can teach us not just about ourselves but what it is to be human…we really don’t want to stay with the nakedness of our present experience. It goes against the grain to stay present. These are the times when only gentleness and a sense of humor can give us the strength to settle down…so whenever we wander off, we gently encourage ourselves to “stay” and settle down. Are we experiencing restlessness? Stay! Are fear and loathing out of control? Stay! Aching knees and throbbing back? Stay! What’s for lunch? Stay! I can’t stand this another minute! Stay!”
Pema Chödrön, The Places That Scare You: A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times
“The more we witness our emotional reactions and understand how they work, the easier it is to refrain.”
Pema Chödrön
“The greatest obstacle to connecting with our joy is resentment.”
Pema Chödrön
“Trying to run away is never the answer to being a fully human. Running away from the immediacy of our experience is like preferring death to life.”
Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times
“It's a transformative experience to simply pause instead of immediately fill up the space. By waiting, we begin to connect with fundamental restlessness as well as fundamental spaciousness.

-Pema Chodron, from "When Things Fall Apart”
Pema Chödrön
“We insist on being Someone, with a capital S. We get security from defining ourselves as worthless or worthy, superior or inferior. We waste precious time exaggerating or romanticizing or belittling ourselves with a complacent surety that yes, that’s who we are. We mistake the openness of our being—the inherent wonder and surprise of each moment—for a solid, irrefutable self. Because of this misunderstanding, we suffer.”
Pema Chödrön, The Places That Scare You: A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times


All Quotes | Add A Quote
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game

When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times When Things Fall Apart
26,040 ratings
Open Preview
The Places That Scare You: A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times The Places That Scare You
11,447 ratings
Open Preview
Start Where You Are: A Guide to Compassionate Living Start Where You Are
7,673 ratings
Open Preview
The Wisdom of No Escape: How to Love Yourself and Your World The Wisdom of No Escape
4,707 ratings
Open Preview