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“We do not think ourselves into new ways of living, we live ourselves into new ways of thinking.”
Richard Rohr
“every time God forgives us, God is saying that God's own rules do not matter as much as the relationship that God wants to create with us.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Most of us were taught that God would love us if and when we change. In fact, God loves you so that you can change. What empowers change, what makes you desirous of change is the experience of love. It is that inherent experience of love that becomes the engine of change.”
Richard Rohr
“Faith does not need to push the river because faith is able to trust that there is a river. The river is flowing. We are in it.”
Richard Rohr
“Before the truth sets you free, it tends to make you miserable.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Christians are usually sincere and well-intentioned people until you get to any real issues of ego, control power, money, pleasure, and security. Then they tend to be pretty much like everybody else. We often given a bogus version of the Gospel, some fast-food religion, without any deep transformation of the self; and the result has been the spiritual disaster of "Christian" countries that tend to be as consumer-oriented, proud, warlike, racist, class conscious, and addictive as everybody else-and often more so, I'm afraid.”
Richard Rohr, Breathing Underwater: Spirituality and the 12 Steps
“There is nothing to prove and nothing to protect. I am who I am and it's enough.”
Fr. Richard Rohr
“People who’ve had any genuine spiritual experience always know that they don’t know. They are utterly humbled before mystery. They are in awe before the abyss of it all, in wonder at eternity and depth, and a Love, which is incomprehensible to the mind.”
Richard Rohr
“It’s a gift to joyfully recognize and accept our own smallness and ordinariness. Then you are free with nothing to live up to, nothing to prove, and nothing to protect. Such freedom is my best description of Christian maturity, because once you know that your “I” is great and one with God, you can ironically be quite content with a small and ordinary “I.” No grandstanding is necessary. Any question of your own importance or dignity has already been resolved once and for all and forever.”
Richard Rohr
“The people who know God well—mystics, hermits, prayerful people, those who risk everything to find God—always meet a lover, not a dictator.”
Richard Rohr, Everything Belongs: The Gift of Contemplative Prayer
“Until we learn to love others as ourselves, it's difficult to blame broken people who desperately try to affirm themselves when no one else will.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Faith is not for overcoming obstacles; it is for experiencing them—all the way through!”
Richard Rohr, Radical Grace: Daily Meditations by Richard Rohr
“The most amazing fact about Jesus, unlike almost any other religious founder, is that he found God in disorder and imperfection—and told us that we must do the same or we would never be content on this earth. ”
Richard Rohr, The Naked Now: Learning to See as the Mystics See
“Sin happens whenever we refuse to keep growing.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“The most common one-liner in the Bible is, "Do not be afraid." Someone counted, and it occurs 365 times.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“The ego hates losing – even to God.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Much of the work of midlife is to tell the difference between those who are dealing with their issues through you and those who are really dealing with you.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“All great spirituality teaches about letting go of what you don’t need and who you are not. Then, when you can get little enough and naked enough and poor enough, you’ll find that the little place where you really are is ironically more than enough and is all that you need. At that place, you will have nothing to prove to anybody and nothing to protect.

That place is called freedom. It’s the freedom of the children of God. Such people can connect with everybody. They don’t feel the need to eliminate anybody . . .”
Richard Rohr, Healing Our Violence through the Journey of Centering Prayer
“Let’s state it clearly: One great idea of the biblical revelation is that God is manifest in the ordinary, in the actual, in the daily, in the now, in the concrete incarnations of life, and not through purity codes and moral achievement contests, which are seldom achieved anyway.”
Richard Rohr
“Thomas Merton said it was actually dangerous to put the Scriptures in the hands of people whose inner self is not yet sufficiently awakened to encounter the Spirit, because they will try to use God for their own egocentric purposes. (This is why religion is so subject to corruption!) Now, if we are going to talk about conversion and penance, let me apply that to the two major groups that have occupied Western Christianity—Catholics and Protestants. Neither one has really let the Word of God guide their lives.

Catholics need to be converted to giving the Scriptures some actual authority in their lives. Luther wasn’t wrong when he said that most Catholics did not read the Bible. Most Catholics are still not that interested in the Bible. (Historically they did not have the printing press, nor could most people read, so you can’t blame them entirely.) I have been a priest for 42 years now, and I would sadly say that most Catholics would rather hear quotes from saints, Popes, and bishops, the current news, or funny stories, if they are to pay attention. If I quote strongly from the Sermon on the Mount, they are almost throwaway lines. I can see Catholics glaze over because they have never read the New Testament, much less studied it, or been guided by it. I am very sad to have to admit this. It is the Achilles heel of much of the Catholic world, priests included. (The only good thing about it is that they never fight you like Protestants do about Scripture. They are easily duped, and the hierarchy has been able to take advantage of this.)

If Catholics need to be converted, Protestants need to do penance. Their shout of “sola Scriptura” (only Scripture) has left them at the mercy of their own cultures, their own limited education, their own prejudices, and their own selective reading of some texts while avoiding others. Partly as a result, slavery, racism, sexism, classism, xenophobia, and homophobia have lasted authoritatively into our time—by people who claim to love Jesus! I think they need to do penance for what they have often done with the Bible! They largely interpreted the Bible in a very individualistic and otherworldly way. It was “an evacuation plan for the next world” to use Brian McLaren’s phrase—and just for their group. Most of Evangelical Protestantism has no cosmic message, no social message, and little sense of social justice or care for the outsider. Both Catholics and Protestants (Orthodox too!) found a way to do our own thing while posturing friendship with Jesus.”
Richard Rohr
“When you get your,'Who am I?', question right, all of your,'What should I do?' questions tend to take care of themselves”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“People who know how to creatively break the rules also know why the rules were there in the first place.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“I do not think you should get rid of your sin until you have learned what it has to teach you.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“The fears that assault us are mostly simple anxieties about social skills, about intimacy, about likeableness, or about performance. We need not give emotional food or charge to these fears or become attached to them. We don’t even have to shame ourselves for having these fears. Simply ask your fears, “What are you trying to teach me?” Some say that FEAR is merely an acronym for “False Evidence Appearing Real.”

From Everything Belongs, p. 143”
Richard Rohr
“Change is not what we expect from religious people. They tend to love the past more than the present or the future.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“there is no path to peace, but peace itself is the path.”
Richard Rohr, Things Hidden: Scripture as Spirituality
“The cross solved our problem by first revealing our real problem, our universal pattern of scapegoating and sacrificing others. The cross exposes forever the scene of our crime.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“In the second half of life, people have less power to infatuate you. But they also have much less power to control you or hurt you.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“In solitude, at last, we’re able to let God define us the way we are always supposed to be defined—by relationship: the I-thou relationship, in relation to a Presence that demands nothing of us but presence itself. Not performance but presence”
Richard Rohr
“When we fail we are merely joining the great parade of humanity that has walked ahead of us and will follow after us.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life

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Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life Falling Upward
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Everything Belongs: The Gift of Contemplative Prayer Everything Belongs
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The Naked Now: Learning to See as the Mystics See The Naked Now
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