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“It is not worth the bother of killing yourself, since you always kill yourself too late.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“A book is a suicide postponed.”
Cioran
“Only optimists commit suicide, optimists who no longer succeed at being optimists. The others, having no reason to live, why would they have any to die?”
Emil Cioran
“I don’t understand why we must do things in this world, why we must have friends and aspirations, hopes and dreams. Wouldn’t it be better to retreat to a faraway corner of the world, where all its noise and complications would be heard no more? Then we could renounce culture and ambitions; we would lose everything and gain nothing; for what is there to be gained from this world?”
Emil Cioran, On the Heights of Despair
“Man starts over again everyday, in spite of all he knows, against all he knows.”
Emil Cioran
“What do you do from morning to night?"

"I endure myself.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“Chaos is rejecting all you have learned, Chaos is being yourself.”
Emil Cioran, A Short History of Decay
“Write books only if you are going to say in them the things you would never dare confide to anyone.”
Emil Cioran
“As far as I am concerned, I resign from humanity. I no longer want to be, nor can still be, a man. What should I do? Work for a social and political system, make a girl miserable? Hunt for weaknesses in philosophical systems, fight for moral and esthetic ideals? It’s all too little. I renounce my humanity even though I may find myself alone. But am I not already alone in this world from which I no longer expect anything?”
Emil Cioran, On the Heights of Despair
“The fact that life has no meaning is a reason to live --moreover, the only one.”
E. M. Cioran
“لا ينتحر إلا المتفائلون، المتفائلون الذين لم يعودوا قادرين على الإستمرار فى التفاؤل. أما الآخرون، فلماذا يكون لهم مبرّر للموت وهم لا يملكون مبرّراً للحياة؟”
Emil Cioran, المياه كلها بلون الغرق
“Is it possible that existence is our exile and nothingness our home?”
Emil Cioran, Tears and Saints
“Knowledge subverts love: in proportion as we penetrate our secrets, we come to loathe our kind, precisely because they resemble us.”
Emil Cioran
“Melancholy: an appetite no misery satisfies.”
Emil Cioran, All Gall Is Divided: Aphorisms
“Only those moments count, when the desire to remain by yourself is so powerful that you'd prefer to blow your brains out than exchange a word with someone.”
Émile Michel Cioran, The New Gods
“Tears do not burn except in solitude.”
Emil Cioran, On the Heights of Despair
“A zoologist who observed gorillas in their native habitat was amazed by the uniformity of their life and their vast idleness. Hours and hours without doing anything. Was boredom unknown to them? This is indeed a question raised by a human, a busy ape. Far from fleeing monotony, animals crave it, and what they most dread is to see it end. For it ends, only to be replaced by fear, the cause of all activity. Inaction is divine; yet it is against inaction that man has rebelled. Man alone, in nature, is incapable of enduring monotony, man alone wants something to happen at all costs — something, anything.... Thereby he shows himself unworthy of his ancestor: the need for novelty is the characteristic of an alienated gorilla.”
E. M. Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
tags: life
“If I were to be totally sincere, I would say that I do not know why I live and why I do not stop living. The answer probably lies in the irrational character of life which maintains itself without reason.”
Emil Cioran, On the Heights of Despair
“If we could truly see ourselves the way others see us we'd disappear on the spot.”
Émile Michel Cioran
“We are so lonely in life that we must ask ourselves if the loneliness of dying is not a symbol of our human existence.”
Emil Cioran, On the Heights of Despair
“The same feeling of not belonging, of futility, wherever I go: I pretend interest in what matters nothing to me, I bestir myself mechanically or out of charity, without ever being caught up, without ever being somewhere. What attracts me is elsewhere, and I don’t know where that elsewhere is.”
Emil M. Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“True confessions are written with tears only. But my tears would drown the world, as my inner fire would reduce it to ashes.”
Emil Cioran, On the Heights of Despair
“How important can it be that I suffer and think? My presence in this world will disturb a few tranquil lives and will unsettle the unconscious and pleasant naiveté of others. Although I feel that my tragedy is the greatest in history—greater than the fall of empires—I am nevertheless aware of my total insignificance. I am absolutely persuaded that I am nothing in this universe; yet I feel that mine is the only real existence.”
Emil Cioran, On the Heights of Despair
“No matter which way we go, it is no better than any other. It is all the same whether you achieve something or not, have faith or not, just as it is all the same whether you cry or remain silent.”
Emil Cioran, On the Heights of Despair
“Sometimes I wish I were a cannibal – less for the pleasure of eating someone than for the pleasure of vomiting him.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“أشعر أنني منفصل تماما عن كل البلدان وعن كل المجموعات. أنا متشرد
ميتافيزيقي

I feel completely detached from any country, any group.
I am a metaphysically displaced person”
Emil Cioran
“To live entirely without a goal! I have glimpsed this state, and have often attained it, without managing to remain there: I am too weak for such happiness.”
Émile Michel Cioran
“Only those are happy who never think or, rather, who only think about life's bare necessities, and to think about such things means not to think at all. True thinking resembles a demon who muddies the spring of life or a sickness which corrupts its roots. To think all the time, to raise questions, to doubt your own destiny, to feel the weariness of living, to be worn out to the point of exhaustion by thoughts and life, to leave behind you, as symbols of your life's drama, a trail of smoke and blood - all this means you are so unhappy that reflection and thinking appear as a curse causing a violent revulsion in you.”
Emil Cioran, On the Heights of Despair
“The multiplication of our kind borders on the obscene; the duty to love them, on the preposterous.”
Emil Cioran
“Do I look like someone who has something to do here on earth?' —That's what I'd like to answer the busybodies who inquire into my activities.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born

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