Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following Lee Strobel.

Lee Strobel Lee Strobel > Quotes


Lee Strobel quotes (showing 1-30 of 150)

“Only in a world where faith is difficult can faith exist.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity
“If your friend is sick and dying, the most important thing he wants is not an explanation; he wants you to sit with him. He's terrified of being alone more than anything else. So, God has not left us alone.”
Lee Strobel
“Faith is only as good as the one in whom it's invested.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for the Real Jesus: A Journalist Investigates Current Attacks on the Identity of Christ
tags: faith
“To be honest, I didn't want to believe that Christianity could radically transform someone's character and values. It was much easier to raise doubts and manufacture outrageous objections that to consider the possibility that God actually could trigger a revolutionary turn-around in such a depraved and degenerate life.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity
“Abruptly, Templeton cut short his thoughts. There was a brief pause, almost as if he was uncertain whether he should continue.
'Uh ... but ... no,' he said slowly, 'he's the most ...' He stopped, then started again. 'In my view,' he declared, 'he is the most important human being who ever existed.'
That's when Templeton uttered the words I neer expected to hear from him. ' And if I may put it this way,' he said in a voice that began to crack, 'I ... miss ... him!'
With that tears flooded his eyes. He turned his head and looked downward, raising his left hand to shield his face from me. His shoulders bobbed as he wept."

-Former Minister and now Agnostic Charles Templeton speaking of Jesus”
Lee Strobel
“If I had stopped asking questions, that’s where I would have remained.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for a Creator: A Journalist Investigates Scientific Evidence That Points Toward God
“In the meantime, prominent British pastor John R. W. Stott, who acknowledged that suffering is “the single greatest challenge to the Christian faith,” has reached his own conclusion: I could never myself believe in God, if it were not for the cross. . . . In the real world of pain, how could one worship a God who was immune to it? I have entered many Buddhist temples in different Asian countries and stood respectfully before the statue of Buddha, his legs crossed, arms folded, eyes closed, the ghost of a smile playing round his mouth, a remote look on his face, detached from the agonies of the world. But each time after a while I have had to turn away. And in imagination I have turned instead to that lonely, twisted, tortured figure on the cross, nails through hands and feet, back lacerated, limbs wrenched, brow bleeding from thorn-pricks, mouth dry and intolerably thirsty, plunged in God-forsaken darkness. That is the God for me! He laid aside his immunity to pain. He entered our world of flesh and blood, tears and death. He suffered for us. Our sufferings become more manageable in light of his. There is still a question mark against human suffering, but over it we boldly stamp another mark, the cross which symbolizes divine suffering. ‘The cross of Christ . . . is God’s only self-justification in such a world’ as ours.25”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity
“I don’t know what the future holds, but I do know who holds my future.”
Lee Strobel, Light the Way Home: My Incredible Ride from New Age to New Life
“God didn’t let Job suffer because he lacked love, but because he did love, in order to bring Job to the point of encountering God face to face, which is humanity’s supreme happiness. Job’s suffering hollowed out a big space in him so that God and joy could fill it.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity
“Mother Teresa used the analogy of electricity: “The wire is you and me; the current is God,” she said. “We have the power to let the current pass through us, use us, and produce the light of the world—Jesus.”
Lee Strobel, Surviving a Spiritual Mismatch in Marriage
“The Jews proposed the ridiculous story that the guards had fallen asleep. Obviously, they were grasping at straws. But the point is this: they started with the assumption that the tomb was vacant! Why? Because they knew it was!”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Christ
“All we needed when we first came to Jesus was his grace, and grace is all we need to grow in Christ. Grace liberates us. Our tendency toward performance imprisons us.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives
“If it's true there's a beginning to the universe, as modern cosmologists now agree, then this implies a cause that transcends the universe. If the laws of physics are fine-tuned to permit life, as contemporary physicists are discovering, then perhaps there's a designer who fine-tuned them. If there's information in the cell, as molecular biology shows, then this suggests intelligent design. To get life going in the first place would have required biological information; the implications point beyond the material realm to a prior intelligent cause. -Stephen C Meyer, PHD”
Lee Strobel, The Case for a Creator: A Journalist Investigates Scientific Evidence That Points Toward God
“It’s hard to think seriously about grace until you understand that you’ve failed morally and will someday stand accountable before a holy God.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives
“Craig summarized his next point succinctly at the outset: “A third factor pointing toward God is the existence of objective moral values in the universe. If God does not exist, then objective moral values do not exist.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity
“These are his people, this congregation of misfits, crack addicts, and drunks, the unshaven, unwashed, unemployed, and unwanted.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives
“Wishful thinking doesn’t change reality.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Hope: Looking Ahead With Confidence and Courage
“Paul himself says that he was converted to a follower of Jesus because he had personally encountered the resurrected Jesus.12 So we have Jesus’ resurrection attested by friend and foe alike, which is very significant.”
Lee Strobel, Finding the Real Jesus: A Guide for Curious Christians and Skeptical Seekers
“But C. S. Lewis made the point that we hate sin but love the sinner all the time — in our own lives. In other words, when we’re judging ourselves, we always love the sinner despite our sin. We accept ourselves, even though we might not always like our behavior.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives
“Would it not be strange if a universe without purpose accidentally created humans who are so obsessed with purpose? Sir John Templeton.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for a Creator: A Journalist Investigates Scientific Evidence That Points Toward God
“the scientific data point powerfully toward the existence of a Creator and that the historical evidence for the resurrection establishes convincingly that Jesus is divine.”
Lee Strobel, Finding the Real Jesus: A Guide for Curious Christians and Skeptical Seekers
“Think about it, Lee - we already know that intelligent minds produce finely tuned devices. Look at the space shuttle. Look at a television set. Look at an internal combustion engine. We see minds producing complex, precision machinery all the time.

So the existence of a supermind - or God - as the explanation for the fine - tuning of the universe makes all sense in the world.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for a Creator: A Journalist Investigates Scientific Evidence That Points Toward God
“Satan greets people in hell by saying: “You’ll find that there’s no right or wrong here—just what works for you.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity
“It’s becoming clearer and clearer to me that this is materialistic philosophy masquerading as empirical science. The attitude is that life had to have developed this way because there’s no other materialistic explanation.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for a Creator: A Journalist Investigates Scientific Evidence That Points Toward God
“He hadn’t changed since I had seen him a few years earlier. With his close-cropped black beard, angular features, and riveting gaze, Craig still looks the role of a serious scholar. He speaks in cogent sentences, never losing his train of thought, always working through an answer methodically, point by point, fact by fact.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Christ
“I interrupted. “Okay, that points toward a Creator, but does it tell us much about him?” “Actually, yes, it does,” Craig replied. “We know this supernatural cause must be an uncaused, changeless, timeless, and immaterial being.” “What’s the basis of your conclusions?” “It must be uncaused because we know that there cannot be an infinite regress of causes. It must be timeless and therefore changeless, at least without the universe, because it was the creator of time. In addition, because it also created space, it must transcend space and therefore be immaterial rather than physical in nature.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity
“We also have volumes of writings by the "apostolic fathers," who were the earliest Christian writers after the New Testament. They authored the Epistle of Clement of Rome, the Epistles of Ignatius, the Epistle of Polycarp, the Epistle of Barnabas, and others. In many places these writings attest to the basic facts about Jesus, particularly his teachings, his crucifixion, his resurrection, and his divine nature. "Which of these writings do you consider most significant?" I asked. Yamauchi pondered the question. While he didn't name the one he thought was most significant, he did cite the seven letters of Ignatius as being among the most important of the writings of the apostolic fathers. Ignatius, the bishop of Antioch in Syria, was martyred during the reign of Trajan before A.D. 117. "What is significant about Ignatius," said Yamauchi, "is that he emphasized both the deity of Jesus and the humanity of Jesus, as against the docetic heresy, which denied that Jesus was really human. He also stressed the historical underpinnings of Christianity; he wrote in one letter, on his way to being executed, that Jesus was truly persecuted under Pilate, was truly crucified, was truly raised from the dead, and that those who believe in him would be raised, too. Put all this together- Josephus, the Roman historians and officials, the Jewish writings, the letters of Paul and the a”
Lee Strobel
“that changes everything.”
Lee Strobel, The Case for the Resurrection
“CRUNCH! Izzy jumped off the bench, which made Alex laugh all over again. “Chill out.” He pointed at a cloud of smoke. “Look, it’s over, see? Number fifty-seven won.” Terrific. The driver of a purple-and-gray wreck waved at the cheering crowd as he circled the other dead and crunched cars. “Survival of the fittest, huh?” Alex put on that smirk that signaled he was about to pass out a little more college wisdom. “Just one more example of how evolution works.” “You’re kidding, right?” This was too lame. He actually believed that smashed cars at the demolition derby proved…what? “No, look.” Alex pointed to a big green car with the back end curled up. “See that Chevy there?” The one with all the smoke coming out of it? He went on. “That’s a ‘79. You can tell by the front end.” What was left of it. But Professor Alex wasn’t done. “Then look at that Chevy right next to it. It’s a ‘77, but it came from the same assembly line. The body is almost the same.” “Okay…” “So that’s the example my professor at Tech used to explain it. Cars that look alike. It’s how scientists look at fossils too. How they can tell that one life-form comes from the next…You know, evolution.” Oh. By that time they had followed the crowd off the grandstands and were making their way to Uncle John’s minivan out in the parking lot. Who was she to argue with a college kid? And yet…something occurred to Izzy about what her cousin was trying to tell her. She turned to him after they’d piled into the backseat. “Those cars you pointed out…” she started. “Yup.”Alex knew the answers. “Just another illustration of evolution.” “Whatever.” This time she couldn’t just smile and nod. “I was just wondering, though. Do you think a real person designed the older car?” “Well, sure.” This time Alex’s face clouded a bit. “And did a real person design the newer car too?” “Sure, but—” “And would there be a chance the designer might have used some of the same ideas, or maybe some of the same drawings, for both cars?” Alex frowned and sighed this time. “That’s not the point.” Wasn’t it? Izzy tried not to rub it in, just let her cousin stew on it. Yeah, so if the cars looked like they were related, that could mean the same person thought them up. Couldn’t it? Just like in creation. Only in creation it would be the same God who used the same kind of plans for the things—and the people—he made. Good example, Alex, she thought, and she tried to keep from smiling as they drove away from the fairgrounds. “Thanks for taking us to the derby,” she told her uncle John. “Maybe we should do it again next year.”
Lee Strobel, Case for a Creator for Kids: A Journalist Investigates Scientific Evidence That Points Toward God
“Briefcase A scientist named Tim Berra wrote a book called Evolution and the Myth of Creationism in 1990. In it, he said that Corvettes can help us understand evolution, because we can see how they changed from year to year. Whoops! Somebody forgot to tell Professor Berra that Corvettes don’t have baby Corvettes. And that Corvettes are designed by intelligent people. So Tim Berra scored a goal for the other side, since his argument was really for intelligent design! Today, it’s called Berra’s Blunder. No one is quite sure when the first demolition derbies were held. Some think a stock-car driver named Larry Mendelsohn organized the first one in Long Island, New York, in the late 1950s. But the Merriam-Webster’s dictionary first included the term “demolition derby” in their 1953 edition. That means there were probably demolition derbies at county fairs at least back in the late 1940s. Anyway, people have been smashing cars for a long time.”
Lee Strobel, Case for a Creator for Kids: A Journalist Investigates Scientific Evidence That Points Toward God

« previous 1 3 4 5

All Quotes | Add A Quote
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game

The Case for Christ The Case for Christ
79,611 ratings
Open Preview
The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity The Case for Faith
26,924 ratings
Open Preview
The Case for a Creator: A Journalist Investigates Scientific Evidence That Points Toward God The Case for a Creator
10,212 ratings
Open Preview
The Case for the Real Jesus: A Journalist Investigates Current Attacks on the Identity of Christ The Case for the Real Jesus
3,095 ratings
Open Preview