Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following Khushwant Singh.

Khushwant Singh Khushwant Singh > Quotes


Khushwant Singh quotes (showing 1-30 of 135)

“Not forever does the bulbul sing
In balmy shades of bowers,
Not forever lasts the spring
Nor ever blossom the flowers.
Not forever reigneth joy,
Sets the sun on days of bliss,
Friendships not forever last,
They know not life, who know not this.”
Khushwant Singh, Train to Pakistan
“When the world is itself draped in the mantle of night, the mirror of the mind is like the sky in which thoughts twinkle like stars.”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi
“Freedom is for the educated people who fought for it. We were slaves of the English, now we will be slaves of the educated Indians—or the Pakistanis.”
Khushwant Singh, Train to Pakistan
“Morality is a matter of money. Poor people cannot afford to have morals. So they have religion.”
Khushwant Singh
“The last to learn of gossip are the parties concerned”
Khushwant Singh, Train to Pakistan
“Maorality is a matter of money. Poor people cannot afford to have morals. So they have religion”
Khushwant Singh, Train to Pakistan
“India is constipated with a lot of humbug. Take religion. For the Hindu, it means little besides caste and cow-protection. For the Muslim, circumcision and kosher meat. For the Sikh, long hair and hatred of the Muslim. For the Christian, Hinduism with a sola topee. For the Parsi, fire-worship and feeding vultures. Ethics, which should be the kernel of a religious code, has been carefully removed.”
Khushwant Singh, Train To Pakistan
“Your principle should be to see everything and say nothing. The world changes so rapidly that if you want to get on you cannot afford to align yourself with any person or point of view.”
Khushwant Singh
“That's Delhi. When life gets too much for you all you need to do is to spend an hour at Nigambodh Ghat,watch the dead being put to flames and hear their kin wail for them. Then come home and down a couple of pegs of whisky. In Delhi, death and drink make life worth living,”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi
“Once through this ruined city did I pass
I espied a lonely bird on a bough and asked
‘What knowest thou of this wilderness?’
It replied: 'I can sum it up in two words:
‘Alas, Alas!”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi
“I asked my soul: What is Delhi? She replied: The world is the body and Delhi its life. Mirza Asadullah Khan Ghalib”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi: A Novel
“We are of the mysterious East. No proof, just faith. No reason, just faith.”
Khushwant Singh, Train To Pakistan
“Poor people cannot afford to have morals. So they have religion.”
Khushwant Singh, Train To Pakistan
“But big people’s illnesses are always made to sound big. The simple shutting and opening of the royal arse-hole was made to sound as if the world was coming to an end.”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi: A Novel
“Consciousness of the bad is an essential prerequisite to the promotion of the good.”
Khushwant Singh, Train To Pakistan
“The doer must do only when the receiver is ready to receive. Otherwise, the act is wasted.”
Khushwant Singh, Train To Pakistan
“If the blanket of man’s fate has been woven black, even the waters of Zam Zam and Kausar cannot wash it white.”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi: A Novel
“If you look at things as they are, there does not seem to be a code either of man or of God on which one can pattern one's conduct. Wrong triumphs over right as much as right over wrong. Sometimes its triumphs are greater. What happens ultimately, you do not know. In such circumstances what can you do but cultivate an utter indifference to all values? Nothing matters. Nothing whatever...”
Khushwant Singh, Train to Pakistan
“When you have counted eighty years and more, Time and Fate will batter at your door; But if you should survive to be a hundred, Your life will be death to the very core.”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi: A Novel
“We also knew that it was in the nature of an empty stomach to produce illusions of grandeur.”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi: A Novel
“It was again to the Prophet Musa that Allah conveyed the essence of true religion. The Almighty said. ‘I was sick, and you did not come to see me. I was hungry, and you did not give me food.’ Musa asked ‘My God, can you also be sick and hungry?’ God replied ‘My servant so-and-so was sick, and my servant so-and-so was hungry. If you had visited one and fed the other, you would have found me with them.”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi: A Novel
“Oh the gladness of her gladness when she’s glad, And the sadness of her sadness when she’s sad; But the gladness of her gladness, And the sadness of her sadness, Are as nothing, Charles, To the badness of her badness when she is bad.”
Khushwant Singh, Khushwant Singh on Women, Sex, Love and Lust
“I am back in my beloved city. The scene of desolation fills my eyes with tears. At every step my distress and agitation increases. I cannot recognize houses or landmarks I once knew well. Of the former inhabitants, there is no trace. Everywhere there is a terrible emptiness. All at once I find myself in the quarter where I once resided. I recall the life I used to live: meeting friends in the evening, reciting poetry, making love, spending sleepless nights pining for beautiful women and writing verses on their long tresses which held me captive. That was life! What is there left of it? Nothing.”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi
“The Hindus hatred of the Mussalmans did not make sense to me. The Muslims had conquered Hindustan. Why hadn’t our gods saved us from them? There was that Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni who had invaded Hindustan seventeen, times—not once or twice but seventeen times. He had destroyed the temple of Chakraswamy at Thanesar and nothing happened to him. Then Somnath. They said that even the sea prostrated itself twice every twenty-four hours to touch the feet of Somnath. But even the sea did not rise to save Somnathji from Mahmud.”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi: A Novel
“One Sikh may argue with one Sikh. One Sikh must never argue with two Sikhs–certainly not after dark.”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi: A Novel
“A modern fad which has gained widespread acceptance amongst the semi-educated who wish to appear secular is the practice of meditation. They proclaim with an air of smug superiority, ‘Main mandir-vandir nahin jaata, meditate karta hoon (I don’t go to temples or other such places, I meditate).’ The exercise involves sitting lotus-pose (padma asana), regulating one’s breathing and making your mind go blank to prevent it from ‘jumping about like monkeys’ from one (thought) branch to another. This intense concentration awakens the kundalini serpent coiled at the base of the spine. It travels upwards through chakras (circles) till it reaches its destination in the cranium. Then the kundalini is fully jaagrit (roused) and the person is assured to have reached his goal. What does meditation achieve? The usual answer is ‘peace of mind’. If you probe further, ‘and what does peace of mind achieve?’, you will get no answer because there is none. Peace of mind is a sterile concept which achieves nothing. The exercise may be justified as therapy for those with disturbed minds or those suffering from hypertension, but there is no evidence to prove that it enhances creativity. On the contrary it can be established by statistical data that all the great works of art, literature, science and music were works of highly agitated minds, at times minds on the verge of collapse. Allama Iqbal’s short prayer is pertinent: Khuda tujhey kisee toofaan say aashna kar dey Keh terey beher kee maujon mein iztiraab naheen (May God bring a storm in your life, There is no agitation in the waves of your life’s ocean.)”
Khushwant Singh, The End Of India
“So many gods, so many creeds, so many paths that wind and wind When just the art of being kind is all that the sad world needs.”
Khushwant Singh, The End Of India
“In a country which had accepted caste distinctions for many centuries, inequality had become an inborn mental concept.”
Khushwant Singh, Train To Pakistan
“Under the circumstances the only honest answer an intelligent person can give to the question ‘Is there a God?’ is to say, ‘I do not know.”
Khushwant Singh, The End Of India
“little mother of ancient days: Thou hast cunningly dyed thy hair but consider That thy bent back will never be straight!”
Khushwant Singh, Delhi: A Novel

« previous 1 3 4 5

All Quotes | Add A Quote
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game

Train to Pakistan Train to Pakistan
14,624 ratings
Open Preview
The Company of Women The Company of Women
2,803 ratings
Open Preview
Delhi Delhi
2,077 ratings
Open Preview
Truth, Love and a Little Malice Truth, Love and a Little Malice
1,189 ratings
Open Preview