Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following Lisa Bodell.

Lisa Bodell Lisa Bodell > Quotes


Lisa Bodell quotes Showing 1-25 of 25

“Scott Barry Kaufman, scientific director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Science of Imagination Project at the Positive Psychology Center, has found that 72 percent of us come up with new, creative ideas when we’re showering. Why? According to Kaufman, “The relaxing, solitary, and non-judgmental shower environment may afford creative thinking by allowing the mind to wander freely, and causing people to be more open to their inner stream of consciousness and daydreams.”8 In other words, simplifying your environment so that you can be alone with your thoughts makes it more likely that you’ll tap into your own creativity.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Organizations and leaders are very good at talking about mission, values, and purpose. They post high-minded statements in the lobby, on their social media pages, on the home page of the company website. Many leaders wouldn’t miss a beat if asked precisely how a young accountant’s job helps their firm contribute to the social good. But this rings hollow if excessive rules, processes, or bureaucracy get in the way. Nothing separates individuals more from a sense that their work is worthwhile than the curse of complication.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“With the best of intentions, we value addition, not subtraction, more, not less.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Simplicity won’t just well up naturally from lower in the organization (although, as we’ll see in the next chapter, everybody at all levels can play a role). You have to make it a strategic priority. You have to give it energy and attention. You have to send the right messages. It’s one of the key things leaders do, and it’s an essential skill to learn if you want to become a leader.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“We can even speak in terms of a new “Golden Rule”: make others’ lives as simple as possible, just as you would like them to do for you.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Many people think that culture is paramount. Not true. If you get the work right, you get the culture right.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“In some ways, achieving simplicity is harder for top executives than it is for others in the organization. But it’s also more important.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“As Jack Welch once said, “For a large organization to be effective, it must be simple.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“In a famous study of the defense contractor Raytheon, sociologist Ronald Burt found that those employees who had a hand in more than one department were more likely to innovate. As he put it, the employees who spanned “structural holes” were at “higher risk” for coming up with good ideas.9 Today, many people don’t have the bandwidth to span “structural holes.” They’re so bogged down in complication that they confine themselves by necessity to their own domains.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“I’ve found that organizations, while well intentioned, tend to approach innovation incorrectly. The very things they put in place to drive innovation—meetings, reports, policies, procedures, task forces, and governing bodies—wind up constricting it. While some structure is important, the best approach to change and innovation usually isn’t to do more, but to do less. Get rid of things that aren’t working to make space for new things that are.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Originating at the top, simplification requires a leadership quality that’s often in short supply: courage. It requires a leap of faith, the belief that freeing people to do higher-level thinking will pay back dividends. And it requires a mindset—the will, foresight, and fortitude to push simplicity through. Do you as a leader have these things? If not, why not?”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“There is no reaction when a fresh idea is presented. What follows is a deluge of excuses for why the idea would not work. (From futurethink 2011 Corporate Culture Study participant, describing the experience of presenting new ideas)”
Lisa Bodell, Kill the Company: End the Status Quo, Start an Innovation Revolution
“Once, several years ago, [GM] tried to stamp out bureaucracy--and ended up appointing a committee to oversee how many committee meetings should be held. (Quoting Sharon Terlep, The Wall Street Journal, "GM's Plodding Culture Vexes Its Impatient CEO," April 7, 2010)”
Lisa Bodell, Kill the Company: End the Status Quo, Start an Innovation Revolution
“That's the problem with large organizations. They create roles and constraints, and sometimes people forget why they're there. (Quoting Joichi Ito, Director, MIT Media Lab)”
Lisa Bodell, Kill the Company: End the Status Quo, Start an Innovation Revolution
“Albert Einstein is famous for having argued that “everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Strelsin asked CEOs an easy question: “How would you describe the most important aspect of your role in the organization?” The CEOs whose companies were inconsistent in their performance prioritized creating a vision, building a specific corporate culture, and developing a specific business strategy. But when Strelsin posed the same question to CEOs of industry-leading companies, most said that they had made it their personal mission, above all else, to simplify the lives of those who worked below them. They pursued simplification in a number of ways: they simplified their strategies so their peers and subordinates could focus on the most important challenges. They simplified their hierarchies, so that their companies could execute their strategies more effectively. They made it a priority to communicate in clear prose that inspired everyone to join in their company’s respective mission. In short, the most successful executives in Strelsin’s study excelled in their jobs because they regarded themselves not merely as CEOs, but as chief simplifiers.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“a great deal of complexity arises because it’s easier to build on top of the things that we’ve already established than to blow up what exists and replace it with something simple.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Our failure to take time in the moment to get down to what really matters sets us on the path to complication. When we opt time and again to add more to what exists, we wind up with a web of complexity we can’t even begin to fathom.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Bain did a study of a manufacturer that instituted a simple rule, halving the default length of meetings to a half hour and mandating that no more than seven employees attend any company discussion. The results were powerful: employees who were left alone to attend to their own responsibilities were much more productive.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Use More Extreme Criteria. Think of what happens to our closets when we use the broad criteria: “Will I wear this someday?” The closet becomes cluttered with clothes we never wear and probably never will. If you ask, “Will I absolutely wear this in the next six months?,” you’re more likely to get rid of an item to make space for something better. Simplification works especially well when you use extreme criteria to challenge how things are done. Some examples: • To solve this problem, give me a solution that would shock people. • To solve this problem, give me an idea that would get you fired. • To solve this problem, give me an idea that would eliminate all or a seemingly impossible amount of something. Example: A group within a telecom company wanted to cut meetings, so they challenged each business unit to eliminate 50 percent of their meetings, knowing full well that this would be near impossible. In the end, managers reporting cutting 15 percent of their meetings, greater than the 5 percent they originally expected.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Delete Toxic People: Delete them from your social networks, contact lists, and phone—right now. Stop hanging out with people who suck your energy, are rude, add no value, or make you feel lousy each time you interact. Say good-bye to bad clients, business partners, and team members. Some guidelines: • If the person is distracting or continually sucks up your time—delete. • If it’s a one-way relationship in the other person’s favor—delete. • If people don’t appreciate you for who you are or what you have to offer—delete. • If you can’t remember who they are or where you met them—delete. • If they communicate with you too much or they clog your inbox—delete.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“At that point, Gilfoy redefined her mission as addressing Vancity’s overreliance on technological complexity to solve process and people problems. The cure indicated for this diagnosis—simplification—was not esoteric or highly technical. Everyone could intuitively understand what it meant to pare back needless processes and steps, and everyone could help do it.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“To administer the ongoing rapid cycling process, Gilfoy created a small office led by Seema Dhanoa, the “director for simplicity.” This manager led a three-person team that included a senior consultant, Christina Fai, whose job it was to be a key facilitator and coach others at Vancity to lead the methodology, and a consultant, Ali Anderson, to coordinate workshops, capture ideas, manage the details, and work on the implementation of the rapid cycles. Rather than staff the team with permanent employees who again would come to “own” simplicity, she rotated employees in and out of the team on temporary assignments to facilitate workshops. Team members were volunteers selected on the basis of their cross-organizational experience, ability to facilitate discussions, ability to learn new processes, and overall curiosity. As they left and went on to other assignments, they would take their simplification experiences with them, helping to build a simplification mindset, competency, and culture within the organization.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“As for the simplification team, Gilfoy’s goal was very clear: she wanted it to fade away over time. If the initiative succeeded, simplicity would be spliced so seamlessly into the company’s DNA that the facilitation the team provided would no longer be necessary. The team was just a triggering mechanism. The heart and soul of simplification was the process that the team helped teach, as well as the accompanying mindset.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters
“Through the process, Gilfoy discovered the most fundamental way to overcome the workforce’s inherent fear of simplicity was to explain the link between simplifying processes and expanding the company’s capacity. Simplification was a way to ensure employees could be released from administrative tasks and turn their attention to the company’s strategic priorities and, in the case of Vancity, the member experience. Less time focused on policies and process would make any company more efficient, but only as a side benefit. The real hope was that rapid cycling would empower individual employees to return to the work that matters. As Gilfoy explained, without addressing the fear that people were going to be pink-slipped at the end of the process, “We couldn’t get the same level of participation or the same level of thinking. And we certainly wouldn’t get the same level of output.”
Lisa Bodell, Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters


All Quotes | Add A Quote

Lisa Bodell
28 followers
Kill the Company: End the Status Quo, Start an Innovation Revolution Kill the Company
186 ratings
Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters Why Simple Wins
164 ratings
Open Preview
Simple: Escape de las trampas de la complejidad y trabaje en lo que realmente importa Simple
10 ratings